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Sympathy for restaurant workers: Is it too much to ask?

"Maybe it's time to start thinking of servers, bartenders, cooks, etc., as people with their own lives to get home to as well, rather than lazy whiners with nothing better to do."

"Maybe it's time to start thinking of servers, bartenders, cooks, etc., as people with their own lives to get home to as well, rather than lazy whiners with nothing better to do."

Reader Sarah Andrewson responds to "Does sitting down at a restaurant at a quarter to close make you a jerk?

You think service industry people who are crabby just want to get home to drink and watch TV? They're regular people with families too.

They want to spend time with their loved ones. They want to make it home in time to tuck their kids into bed or have a meal with their significant other. They're people working their way through school, trying to get home to finish their homework. And yes, I'm sure there are a couple who would love to get home to watch Orange is the New Black. (Do people actually watch this show on DVD?)

The expectation that people don't linger after close is not based on some sort of industry insider information. It's simply based on regular, good old fashioned etiquette. You know, the kind you extend to people you respect.

If you throw a party from 5-9, you would probably be a little annoyed if people showed up at 8:45 and stuck around for an hour, preventing you from going to bed or relaxing after a long day of prep, cooking, cleaning, and serving.

I'm not saying servers are justified in treating people like crap if they come in late. There are certainly better ways to handle the situation.

But maybe it's time to start thinking of servers, bartenders, cooks, etc., as people with their own lives to get home to as well, rather than lazy whiners with nothing better to do.

Because chances are that if you just busted your ass running around a hot bar or restaurant all night you would be pretty anxious to get home too.