When Mike Ness started Social Distortion in 1979, it was one of the very first West Coast punk rock bands. Now, the term "punk rock" doesn't seem to fit Social D; at least, not entirely. It's still very much a part of what they do, but the group has such obvious roots in country, blues, and good ol' classic rock that it feels like the genre they helped establish is now another influence, a facet of a sound that embodies outlaw Americana. Ness has had more than his fair share of hard living and heartbreak, and it's all been funneled into a catalog of songs that play like a hymnal for those who never thought much of following the rules. That sense of defiance has earned Social D its place, not just in terms of punk, but in the larger context of American rock 'n' roll. For decades, Ness held up his damaged icons for the whole world to see, and in the process, became one himself. With Lucero and Frank... More >>>