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Woman sues Minneapolis police for shooting her two service dogs [VIDEO]

Security video shows Ciroc approaching the officer wagging its tail, only to be shot in the face at close range.

Security video shows Ciroc approaching the officer wagging its tail, only to be shot in the face at close range. Associated Press

The burglary alarm had accidentally been set off at Jennifer LeMay's Minneapolis home. Though she called Xfinity 12 minutes later to relay that no bad guys were on the premises, that message apparently never reached police.

Officers Michael Mays and Daniel Ledman arrived a half-hour later, still believing they were on a burglar call. Ledman took the front. Mays took the back, entering the fenced yard. That's where he encountered two American Staffordshire Terriers.

It fairly certain he's not a dog man, either afraid of the animals or simply unfamiliar. Both were service dogs – Rocko for seizure alerts, and Ciroc for psychiatric and sensory afflictions. Neither seemed much of a threat.

Security video from LeMay's home shows Ciroc approaching Mays with its tail wagging, the international signal that says, “I'd like to be petted now, please.” But Mays, clearly panicking, opens fire. Then Rocko runs toward the officer, still not in a manner that would be considered threatening to anyone comfortable with dogs. Mays shoots again.

Both dogs miraculously lived, even though they were shot at close range. Mays would later write in his report that “two large size pit bulls charged.” Yet this would easily be refuted by security footage.

Minneapolis police were not exactly apologetic about the 2017 incident, LeMay claims. The dogs could no longer be used as service animals, but the city refused to cover the $6,000 vet bill, and talks of any other payment were not to her liking.

So last week, LeMay filed suit. It accuses the officers of illegally entering her property, “irrationally” shooting her dogs, and sending one of her kids who witnessed the incident to months of therapy.

She's also suing Xfinity for good measure, claiming it failed to notify the cops of the false alarm in the first place.