Wisconsin lost more jobs than any other state over last year

Walker hasn't kept one of his biggest promises.
Walker hasn't kept one of his biggest promises.

It's a finding that Eric Pusey, founder of the Minnesota Progressive Project, characterized as "yet another reason to be glad we don't have Governor Emmer."

Remember when Scott Walker promised to create 250,000 new jobs during his first term? If Wisconsin voters do, then Walker is probably in trouble come the June 5 recall election, because it turns out that Wisconsin's job market actually deteriorated more than any other state's in the past year.

Over the year, unemployment in Wisconsin has increased by 0.9 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports.

From the Bureau:

Over the year, nonfarm employment increased in 45 states and the District of Columbia, decreased in 4 states, and was unchanged in Alabama. The largest over-the-year percentage increase occurred in North Dakota (+6.5 percent). The largest over-the-year percentage decrease in employment occurred in Wisconsin (-0.9 percent).

Wisconsin, the Bureau notes, was the only state to show a statistically significant decrease in the number of people on nonfarm payrolls from April 2011 through March, with 23,900 jobs lost.

The Think Progress blog writes that the latest job numbers add more evidence to a trend they've seen in other areas of the country: states undergoing the most drastic budget cuts are seeing the biggest job losses. "Budget slashing at the state level is stalling growth and reducing GDP," blogger Annie-Rose Strasser argues.

Maybe, after June 5, Walker can pick up some part-time work as a regular guest on Emmer's radio show? Because over in his home state, it looks like it'll be harder for him to find a new gig than it was before his administration came to power.

See also:
-- Tom Emmer: If I were guv, Minnesota would "make Wisconsin look like [an] ugly step-child"

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