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Wade Michael Page, Wisconsin Sikh temple shooter: Image circulating [PHOTO]

Some think Page might have confused Sikhs for Muslims, but thus far his motive remain unclear.
Some think Page might have confused Sikhs for Muslims, but thus far his motive remain unclear.

This morning, a photo of Wade Michael Page -- the 40-year-old U.S. Army veteran suspected of being the sole gunman responsible for the Milwaukee-area Sikh temple shooting that left seven dead yesterday, including Page himself -- began to circulate around the internet.

The photo was released by the Southern Poverty Law Center. In an accompanying article, the SPLC described Page as "a frustrated neo-Nazi who had been the leader of a racist white-power band."

Here's the photo:

Wade Michael Page, Wisconsin Sikh temple shooter: Image circulating [PHOTO]

This morning, Reuters provides some details about Page's military career:

The man suspected of shooting and killing six people at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin was discharged from the U.S. Army in 1998 for 'patterns of misconduct,' including being drunk on duty, military sources said on Monday.

Wade Michael Page, who served in the military for six years but was never stationed overseas, was a psychological operations specialist and Hawk Missile System repairman who was last stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

In June 1998 he was disciplined for being drunk on duty and had his rank reduced from sergeant to specialist. He was not eligible to re-enlist, the sources said.

And the SPLC provides information about Page's post-military white-power music career:

In 2010, Page, then the leader of the band End Apathy, gave an interview to the white supremacist website Label 56. He said that when he started the band in 2005, its name reflected his wish to "figure out how to end people's apathetic ways" and start "moving forward." "I was willing to point out some of my faults on how I was holding myself back," Page said. Later, he added, "The inspiration was based on frustration that we have the potential to accomplish so much more as individuals and a society in whole." He did not discuss violence in the interview.

Page told the website that he had been a part of the white power music scene since 2000, when he left his native Colorado on a motorcycle. He attended white power concerts in Georgia, North Carolina, West Virginia and Colorado. At various times, he said, he also played in the hate rock bands Youngland (2001-2003), Celtic Warrior, Radikahl, Max Resist, Intimidation One, Aggressive Force and Blue Eyed Devils. End Apathy, he said, included "Brent" on bass and "Ozzie" on drums; the men were former members of Definite Hate and another band, 13 Knots.


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