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The problems with creating a sustainable food forest in Minneapolis

One of the keys will be keeping for-profit parasites from ruining it for everyone.

One of the keys will be keeping for-profit parasites from ruining it for everyone.

Reader Timothy Clemens responds to A plan to turn Haiwatha Golf Course into Minneapolis' first food forest:

I want this to happen and will be involved heavily, but I hope it is policed heavily because homeless people already camp out on the lake in the forest there.

I think the general public picking from a park in Minneapolis will end up with a small amount of people picking everything and trying to sell it. The only reason foraging works at all is because it isn't advertised and it's not accessible without wanting to look into the hobby yourself,  so the people who do end up doing it are largely people who already really care about nature.

When it becomes very open to casuals, you have what happened to American ginseng and ramps: local extinction and devastating for-profit harvesters.