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The Godfather of the New Downtown Luxury Apartment Buildings: The Nic on 5th

The first of the new downtown luxury apartment towers

The first of the new downtown luxury apartment towers

The Nic on 5th is the godfather of the new generation of fancy downtown luxury apartment towers. When its plans were originally announced back in 2012, it was the first high-rise rental building planned for downtown in nearly three decades. Now we can't go six weeks without a new high-end skyscraper rendering being published.

Sitting in what might be, geographically speaking, the exact center of downtown Minneapolis, it was built for people who either never leave downtown or want their own place to crash when visiting from the suburbs or out-of-state. See also: Better Know A Luxury Apartment Building: The Walkway

One of the busiest transit stations in the city sits right at its doorstep, ready to whisk its distinguished residents to the airport for their next weekend getaway. But incredible convenience and optimal urban planning aside, one has to wonder if the 24-hour, chaotic clanging and rumbling the trains create detracts from its opulence. Life in the big city!

All of these luxury apartment buildings pump up their classy culture, but none of them lay it on as thick as The Nic on 5th. Each floor plan has a name, and the names are unbearably pretentious.

"Did you enjoy The Quinton, sir? No? Well let's take you right over to The Madelyn, it has a much more spacious balcony. And on the way down we just have to stop at the wine and truffle party."

Address: 465 Nicollet Mall Opened: September 2014 Developer: Opus Development Height: 26 stories Number of Apartments: 253 Target Demos: Cosmopolitan Trust Fund Baby, Childless Downtown Power Broker, Lake Minnetonka Resident Looking for Urban Crash Pad Best Amenity: The 30,000-square-foot sixth-floor party deck looks like the kind of place Bud Light would film its next Mango-Rita commercial.

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Street-Level Restaurant: 24,000 square feet of retail still available! What did it used to be? For most of the 20th century it was home to a string of long-deceased department stores. Vacant lot since 1993. Model on Website: Just bathing in luxury

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