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Tax attack ad blows up in Republicans' faces in Rosemount

Keith Downey, chairman of the Republican Party of Minnesota, tried to say this wasn't the GOP's mailer. The fine print says otherwise.

Keith Downey, chairman of the Republican Party of Minnesota, tried to say this wasn't the GOP's mailer. The fine print says otherwise.

It’s almost as if the Minnesota Republican Party doesn’t want people to vote for Donald Trump.

Over the weekend, the party sprinkled attack ads against state DFL House candidate John Huot, who is running against Republican incumbent Anna Wills.

The mailer sent across Rosemount reads: “Would you trust someone who didn’t pay his own taxes to protect our tax dollars?”

A rhetorical question. And incredibly bad timing, since it happens to be more applicable to the Republican presidential nominee than anyone else in America at this very moment.

Trump famously refuses to release his tax returns, which would reveal how much he’s really worth, how good of a businessman he really is, how much he’s actually given to charity, and of course, whether he carries his own load as a tax-paying American.

During the first presidential debate on September 26, he suggested that getting out of paying federal income taxes was “being smart.”

But just as Minnesota Republicans were vilifying candidates who don't pay their taxes, the New York Times got a hold of Trump’s 1995 tax records, which shows the self-aggrandizing businessman lost nearly a billion dollars that year after mismanaging a bunch of casinos. It was such a tremendous loss that it could have legally exempted him from federal income taxes for the following 18 years.

For a guy who claims to have $10 billion, that’s a hell of a lot of welfare.

Now back to John Huot, the DFL candidate and intended target of the state GOP attack ad. His tax issues pale in comparison.

Two decades ago, Huot’s family owned a small flower business that went under. He thought all the business taxes were paid off, but later found out that he was delinquent, Huot said. His family had to scramble to pay off a lien. By 2008, they were square with the IRS.