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'Soft sex R&B' + rap battle = murder in Minneapolis

Quinten Osgood Jr. would settle this in the way all God's creatures use to establish male dominance in the natural world: with a rap battle.

Quinten Osgood Jr. would settle this in the way all God's creatures use to establish male dominance in the natural world: with a rap battle.

Anthony Madison's girlfriend invited Quinten Osgood Jr. and another woman over to their south Minneapolis home for a night of drinking and music. The evening didn't go as pleasantly as planned.

At some point Madison left, only to return to discover that Osgood had changed the play selection to “soft sex R&B,” as Osgood later described it. The pair had just met that night, but Madison found his new friend's music tastes lacking. The men got to arguing.

So Osgood cranked his phone to beats. They would settle this in the way all God's creatures use to establish male dominance in the natural world: with a rap battle.

Yet what began as fun quickly turned to hitting a bit too close to home. “It became more of a battle in a sense,” Osgood would later say, “him disrespecting me and me doing the same thing. It became really heated.”

Rapping turned to free-form cussing. Madison told Osgood to leave.

On his way to the street, Osgood kicked a gate open. A security camera caught Madison, his steam renewed, give chase over this slight. Osgood stumbled backward and fell. Madison leaped upon him. So Osgood stabbed him in the chest.

In court last week, Osgood testified that a knife fell from Madison, and he used it to stab his foe. “I was scared,” he said.

But he apparently didn't make the most convincing witness. He has four previous convictions for domestic assault, plus a multitude of violations of protection orders. As Hennepin County prosecutor Dominick Mathews noted, Madison was wearing gym shorts and a T-shirt, making it very hard to conceal a knife, while Osgood was wearing a big coat.

Just to make his testimony less convincing, Mathews noted that, after Osgood was arrested, he failed to mention to police that the knife fell from Madison, or that Madison had threatened to kill him.

Thus, his performance on the stand was not considered a hit. Osgood was convicted of two counts of second-degree murder and one count of first-degree manslaughter.