MN for Marriage suddenly worried people might think they're bigots

Instead of fretting about being called bigots, why not just own it?
Instead of fretting about being called bigots, why not just own it?

Well, this is rich. With marriage equality a Senate vote and a Mark Dayton signature away from becoming the law of the land in Minnesota, Minnesota for Marriage -- the state's leading unintentional comedy troupe anti-gay marriage organization -- is suddenly worried about people thinking they're bigots.

In a statement released after yesterday's House vote, Minnesota for Marriage urges the Senate to vote no.

FROM NOVEMBER: MN for Marriage's concession: "God has defined marriage as between one man and one woman"

Senators "must ask themselves whether or not they will choose to classify half of Minnesotans who believe that marriage is between one man and one woman as bigots under the law," the statement says.

As is the case in recent mailings Minnesota for Marriage sent to outstate areas, yesterday's news release emphasizes the fact that Minnesota is nearly evenly divided when it comes to gay marriage, with support concentrated in the Twin Cities metro region.

"If we redefine marriage with the passage of this bill, over one million Minnesotans will be forced to either affirm what they believe to be false or subject themselves to prosecution and insult as 'bigots' and 'criminals['] under our law," the statement says.

Criminals? While a compelling argument could be made that bigotry should be a crime, there's nothing in the Dibble/Clark marriage equality bill that criminalizes hating on homosexuals (as long as no other laws are broken in the process). So in the eleventh hour, as they've been wont to do since the marriage amendment was a hot topic of conversation, Minnesota for Marriage is again playing fast and loose with the facts.

-- Follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter at @atrupar. Got a tip? Drop him a line at

Sponsor Content


All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >