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Minnesota Salvage's Heather Fisher has her shot at reality TV stardom

Filming in Mankato

Filming in Mankato

America loves home improvement TV, loves watching corn-fed, flannel-wearing dudes and dudettes rummaging in condemned attics – the dirtier the better – for forgotten things that pop with just a little bit of spit and a shine.

Now, the Tennessee-based Scripps Network has its eyes on 33-year-old Heather Fisher, owner of Salvage Sisters furniture store in Mankato. After two years of sporadic filming with the makers of Salvage Dawgs, Fisher has a pilot due to air April 10 at 4 p.m. on Great American Country.

She had to beat out nearly 1,000 other rehab hopefuls to get the network’s nod to test a pilot. If enough viewers tune in Sunday, she might have a chance at her own TV series, featuring Salvage Sisters’ adventures in burrowing in dumpsters for furniture.

Fisher, of fourth-generation antiquing stock, floats a charming Minnesotan inflection in the pilot teaser that as she announces that she hails from “MAN-katoh, Minnesota,” and she’s ready to “rahk and rowl.”

A lot of these shows about salvaging buildings show men hacking and sanding and drinking beer, Fisher says. The producers seemed to like the concept of featuring a woman-owned business.

The series would shadow Fisher as she crawls around in decrepit barns, emerging with tables and chairs layered in pigeon poop that can be remade into the sort of pieces they serve brunch on in Uptown.

Heather Fisher imagining lamps out of blocks of wood.

Heather Fisher imagining lamps out of blocks of wood.

“Myself and my friends, we’re all just women in our early 30s, we all have kids and all just trying to do something for ourselves,” Fisher says. “We’re a part of that whole culture shift back to mom and pop, back where it used to be, working with our hands, being craft workers.”