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Minneapolis-St. Paul officially becomes America's most hard luck sports town

Blair Walsh's chunked field goal against Seattle last season doomed the Purple's most recent shot at Super Bowl immortality.

Blair Walsh's chunked field goal against Seattle last season doomed the Purple's most recent shot at Super Bowl immortality.

With apologies to the Minnesota Lynx, the last time a major sports team in the Land of 10,000 Lakes struck championship gold Arne Carlson inhabited the governor's mansion, the song of year belonged to Bryan Adams, and Edina High hockey coach Curt Giles was captaining the North Stars to the Stanley Cup Finals against Pittsburgh.

It's been nearly 25 years since the Twins outlasted the Atlanta Braves in seven games and gave Minnesota sports fans their second World Series title. Now that the Cleveland Cavaliers have delivered the Mistake on the Lake's first championship in 52 years, the titleholder for enduring pro sports ineptitude is no other than Minneapolis-St. Paul.

Among cities that harbor at least three of the four major U.S. sports, the Twin Cities now boasts the longest drought. Minneapolis-St. Paul's dearth bests Washington, D.C. by about a year, the Redskins last winning a Super Bowl in 1992.

Rounding out the loser list are Houston and Atlanta, both cities hoisting banners in 1995. 

Considering the Twins' implosion and the Wild's contractual marriages with ne'er-do-wells Ryan Suter and Thomas Vanek, neither team looks likely to contend for a title anytime soon.

The T-wolves own the most promising young roster in the NBA. But the leap between promising and a championship is fraught with peril. 

That pretty much means that hope lies with the purple perpetrators of heartbreak. 

Bud Grant's Vikings played in four Super Bowls, the most recent disappointment coming 40 years ago. Since then, the scar tissue includes the home field crusher against 11-point underdog Atlanta in the '98 NFC championship.