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Michele Bachmann is pissed Obama didn't declare Dzhokhar Tsarnaev an enemy combatant

Bachmann believes the government should be able to classify American citizens arrested on American soil as enemy combatants. Slippery slope much?
Bachmann believes the government should be able to classify American citizens arrested on American soil as enemy combatants. Slippery slope much?

Michele Bachmann and John Kriesel have something in common -- they're both upset federal agents didn't altogether disregard whatever constitutional rights Boston bombing suspect and American citizen Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has.

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During a recent appearance on Greta Van Susteren's Fox News show, Bachmann said the Obama administration's decision not to classify Tsarnaev as an enemy combatant is a "miscarriage of justice." That classification would've allowed officials to question Tsarnaev indefinitely before any charges were pressed.

"Now we have essentially duct tape over the mouth of this terrorist and we can't use him to link together this treasure trove of information," said Bachmann, who is a lawyer (as the Huffington Post wryly notes). "The people hurt the most are the people watching your show and innocent Americans all across the United States. That shouldn't be."

During the Van Susteren segment, Bachmann characterized Tsarnaev as an "Islamic jihadist," "terrorist number two" (number one presumably being his deceased brother), and described the Boston bombings as being tantamount to a declaration of war.

Given her belief that Tsarnaev is so obviously guilty he shouldn't have the right to a trial in a court of law, Bachmann blames President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder for jeopardizing public safety.

"Trust me, this decision would have been made at the top level," Bachmann told Van Susteren. "That's why we have to question Eric Holder and the president of the United States. Who made this decision?"

Compare Bachmann's legal philosophy to that of lawyer and revolutionary John Adams. As Glenn Greenwald notes, Adams worked as a defense attorney on behalf of British soldiers who were accused of murdering five colonists in Boston (of all places) in 1770. Adams later called his service on behalf of those soldiers "one of the most gallant, generous, manly and disinterested actions of my whole life, and one of the best pieces of service I ever rendered my country."

If you'd like to see the footage of Bachmann's Van Susteren appearance, click here.

-- Follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter at @atrupar. Got a tip? Drop him a line at arupar@citypages.com.


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