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Maple Match: A dating site for Americans seeking refuge from Trump in Canada

"I knew fate would bring us together. That and the allure of a green card in the face of the impending doom of a Donald Trump presidency."

"I knew fate would bring us together. That and the allure of a green card in the face of the impending doom of a Donald Trump presidency."

As Donald Trump poises himself to become the GOP’s presidential nominee, a lot of dazed and disillusioned Americans are weighing their options in case the Drumpf actually gets elected. The most desperate have desperate plans: to leave the country.

Joe Goldman, a 25-year-old Texas liberal who figures he's a pretty good-looking guy, came up with an idea to smuggle his way out of America. He recently founded a dating site called Maple Match, which is supposed to pair marriageable Americans in need of green cards with humanitarian Canadian partners.

To be fair, Maple Match is very straightforward about the arrangement being primarily one of political refuge. The potential of finding eternal love at the same time is merely a plus.

The dating site hasn’t officially launched yet – and there’s a good chance it will never amount to more than rollicking political gimmick – but thousands of Americans and Canadians have already signed up for the waitlist. Because even if Maple Match is nothing more than a statement, the urge to exodus is pretty real.

Yasmine Hassan, a 28-year-old bachelorette from Montreal, says she would extend safety and shelter to an American in need. If she were an American citizen, making plans to thrust herself upon a willing Canadian spouse would top her priorities as well.

"It's strange, but since things got crazy, I'm not surprised at all that people are considering moving," Hassan says. "I have friends who are actually saying they need to leave, just because they're visible minorities and they know life will be different."

Joe Goldman, the 25-year-old Texan founder of Maple Match, says he's legitimately signed up to start wooing Candadians.

Joe Goldman, the 25-year-old Texan founder of Maple Match, says he's legitimately signed up to start wooing Candadians.

Hassan has friends who immigrated to America from all over the world, dreaming the American dream. If that fails, Canada makes a solid runner-up, she says. 

For anyone who's thinking about wooing their way into Canada, Hassan's got some tips.

"I think we have a lot of misconceptions here, that Americans are not very smart, they don’t know much about the world, they’re very America-centric," she says. "I would suggest to anyone signing up for [Maple Match], to read up about the world, read up about Canada. We don’t just have moose in our backyards here. Get to know Canada before you come and ask about our beer and our moose."