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Lakeville teens arrested for racist vandalism

The teenagers painted white supremacist messages and smashed a windshield.

The teenagers painted white supremacist messages and smashed a windshield.

Any Minnesotans got all high and mighty about the planned Nazi rally in Wisconsin -- don't forget to RSVP! -- should probably just hang back a bit until we find out more about a group of Lakeville teenagers arrested last week.

Five juveniles were arrested for their role in a case of hateful vandalism. At around 1 a.m. on Thursday, the boys spray-painted graffiti on the outside of a black family's garage, then sneaked inside the garage to continue. There, they left Nazi slogans on the car, in the backseat of a car, and smashed-up the windshield, according to KARE 11.

The family said they moved to the Lakeville area to get away from the occasional violence in north Minneapolis. Now they're wondering if they did the right thing thanks to these little punks, whose names haven't been released by police because they're all under 18 -- both in age, and IQ, it seems.

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Lakeville police chief Thomas Vonhof told KARE 11 the crimes would be treated as felonies due to the dollar amount of property damage done. The boys, who have apparently now all admitted to their crimes, will now be at the whim of the Dakota County Attorney's Office, which had not filed criminal charges as of Friday.

The mother of the victim family, who only gave her first name, "Tanesha," to KARE 11, said this wasn't the first time their house has been targeted since she and her children -- Tanesha is a single mother with eight children -- moved from north Minneapolis to Lakeville in May.

Police Chief Tom Vonhof said the boys confessed to the crimes.

Police Chief Tom Vonhof said the boys confessed to the crimes.

The house had been pelted by eggs, and on the Fourth of July someone threw lit firecrackers at the exterior of the home. Another time, the words "White Power" were spraypainted on the sidewalk near the house.

Now, with those same two words sprayed on the outside and, scarily, inside of the garage, Tanesha told KARE 11 she feels different:

"[The vandals] stripped me of my sense of comfort. Now we have to keep the lights on, keep every door locked, and keep the children indoors."
Tanesha said after Thursday's break-in, she'd had to explain to her kids what racism is.