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Jordan Kavoosi and Plagiarism Inc: A reporter's notebook

Would you let these guys do your homework?
Would you let these guys do your homework?
Photo: Hannah Delon

Jordan Kavoosi, founder of Apple Valley-based Essay Writing Company and the subject of this week's feature, is in the term-paper racket. The business model is simple: For $23 per page, he'll commission one of his employees to write your essay.

Kavoosi won't say how much he pays his employees, but many of his writers told City Pages that -- when they do get paid -- it's around $8-$10 per page. Kavoosi says his writers have done everything from standard essays to graduate school dissertations to 250-pagers. He claims that once someone paid him $200 to find the name of an obscure 1970s made-for-TV movie.

Kavoosi's business pedals more than just term papers. For a price, his writers will take your online class. They'll take your test. "You need us to walk your dog?" says Kavoosi. "That's fine. Just give me 20 bucks."

In interviews with Kavoosi's writers, some said they thought the work was unethical, but did it because they were strapped for cash.

Others said they didn't think the business was unethical. Said one writer, who asked to remain anonymous:

"I don't believe this is true. Education's primary purpose is to teach people valuable skills, for example reading or critical thinking or persuasive writing. Well, students can only acquire these skills if they generally want to learn them. But if they don't to learn them they will finally pass the exam and they fill forget about it...Students who pay for term papers are obviously not interested in retaining that information in the class for them."

Kavoosi (middle) and friends paraded around Apple Valley last week to attract attention to the business.
Kavoosi (middle) and friends paraded around Apple Valley last week to attract attention to the business.
Photo: Hannah Delon
When Kavoosi stood up from this picture, he cracked his car's windshield.
When Kavoosi stood up from this picture, he cracked his car's windshield.
Photo: Hannah Delon
Striking a pose for the camera.
Striking a pose for the camera.
Photo: Hannah Delon

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On March 11, at 6:47 p.m., Apple Valley police responded to call from Kavoosi's mother, Dana Heinzelman, complaining about harassing phone calls to her son. Someone with a deep, "male" voice had somehow hijacked Kavoosi's voice mail message, changing it to warn callers that he was a scam artist.

Someone with the same voice had also been calling his family members. The anonymous caller once called Kavoosi from a number that appeared to be from his own phone. When he answered, the voice called him a "little bitch," according to court records.

From the police incident report:

"Dana stated the male has been calling for two days at different times. Dana said they have also been informed by customers that their website has had a virus on it and she suspects the same person...Dana said the male has called several different numbers and the male told them that the Police would never catch him because he has been using other pone number that he has highjacked (sic).

"Dana said that she was reporting the issue because her son was at home about to have a nervous breakdown over the problem. Dana said Jordan recently fired a writer named Deborah Morse Kahn, DOB: 2-22-52. Dana said Morse-Kahn threatened to take the company down and Jordan was in the process of obtaining a restraining order against her.

"Dana has no suspect information on the male who has been calling...No solid suspect information at this time. Nothing further."

Later in a restraining order hearing, Kavoosi accused Morse-Kahn, a former writer, of being the anonymous caller with a voice changer. Morse-Kahn called him several times the day his voice mail was hacked, which he believes implicates her.

Morse-Kahn denies having the knowledge of computers to even pull off the stunt. "I'm a queen of research, but I can't deal with software," she says.

A Dakota County judge threw out the restraining order because Kavoosi didn't have enough evidence. Though several former writers for Kavoosi's company are bitter toward their old boss, none confessed to making the calls in interviews with City Pages.

A better shot of the "EWC" tattoo.
A better shot of the "EWC" tattoo.
Photo: Hannah Delon

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