comScore

Gopher football announcer's voice invades homes two miles from stadium

itemprop

St. Paul residents in St. Anthony Park had an unwelcome guest in their homes and backyards Saturday when the Gopher football team debuted in their first game at the new TCF Bank Stadium on campus. The Gopher play-by-play announcer's voice, booming through the stadium to fans, happened to travel as far as two miles from the stadium and was heard like a booming car stereo in homes.

Well you can imagine these residents were a little pissed off. First off they don't even live in the same city as the stadium and already put up with their share of disruptions with the Minnesota State Fair each year in their backyard. And let's be honest, people in the stadium probably got sick of the overly loud announcer. Can you imagine having to listen to him when you weren't even hyped up on booze and stomping around in the stadium?

Noise concerns in St. Paul weren't one of the top concerns of neighbors when the stadium project was proposed, but the University of Minnesota will probably have to reconsider turning down the play-by-plays to keep neighbors supportive.

More from the Pioneer Press:

Phil Carlson, who lives nearly two miles from the stadium, three blocks west of the student center on the university's St. Paul campus, said he was stunned when he heard the clarity of the announcer's tones at the Gopher's home opener as he worked in his yard. "It sounds like the voice of God from the treetops right in the next block. I don't want to be overdramatic, but it was stunning."

An online neighborhood forum quickly drew comments over the weekend from unhappy residents complaining about the noise and the announcer's distinguishable words: "I go to the back deck to sit, and I can still hear and understand that man's hollering. The sound of the crowd is not so bad ... only occasionally a low roar, one could work on imagining that it is the sound of the sea, but this loud, yelling man ... we must stop him," wrote St. Anthony resident Sue Conner.

Her husband, Sherman Eagles, characterized the sound level as akin to that of a car sitting in front of his house with the stereo fully cranked up and the windows down. "Even inside the house, it was loud."

University spokesman Dan Wolter told the PiPress the school would be taking in complaints about operations at the first game to figure out improvements. It was only the first game after all.

One lady interviewed thought people were freaking out over nothing. Her money quote: "Like, get over yourself. We live in the city; just deal with it."