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Downtown Minneapolis story stinks of racism, ableism, and classism

Instead of addressing the sociological and city planning choices that resulted in an inhospitable city center, you turned your focus on the people who live and congregate there.

Instead of addressing the sociological and city planning choices that resulted in an inhospitable city center, you turned your focus on the people who live and congregate there. Renee Jones Schneider

Reader Sara Ibis responds to A Town Turned Mean: What happened to downtown Minneapolis? 

I just completed reading the article "A Town Turned Mean" and I have to say I'm disappointed.

Instead of addressing the sociological and city planning choices that resulted in an inhospitable city center, you turned your focus on the people who live and congregate there.

Yes, people suck (groundbreaking news, guys), but this article does very little to address the other issues that have made downtown Minneapolis just so awful. I highly encourage you to do a follow-up to this article addressing the choices city planners, architects, businesses, politicians and citizens that have made that resulted in the downtown we know today, choices that often fly in the face of common sense, decency, and freshman level sociology.

From an editorial standpoint, you are walking a fine line with veiled language that stinks of racism, able-ism, and classism.