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Dayton Slams "Despicable" Anti-Transgender Bigots in Awesome Rant

"The idea that Clay Matthews is going to change gender status to go trample young girls on a basketball course is ludicrous"

"The idea that Clay Matthews is going to change gender status to go trample young girls on a basketball course is ludicrous"

Governor Dayton called out anti-transgender protesters for their "hate-mongering" at the end of a press conference about Minnesota's budget surplus yesterday.

After talking about the budget surplus for roughly 15 minutes, Dayton asked if there were any other questions. A reporter asked about the Minnesota State High School League's decision yesterday to allow students who were born male but identify as female to participate in female sports.

Dayton responded with a strongly worded two-minute speech. Some excerpts: See also: Newspapers Across MN Run Another Anti-Transgender Ad

"I think some of the hate-mongering that was going on was despicable. The idea that Clay Matthews is going to change gender status to go tromple [sic] young girls on a basketball court, I mean, it's just so ... it's ludicrous but it's not funny because it's so hurtful."

The Clay Matthews reference was alluding an an op-ed that appeared in the Star Tribune yesterday, in which John D. Hagen Jr., a Minneapolis lawyer, wrote this:

Imagine the following scenario. An adolescent counterpart of Clay Matthews (the very long-haired, very burly linebacker for the Green Bay Packers) comes before your school board. He declares: "I always have had a feminine self-image. I never told anyone, because of society's expectations, but I'm revealing it now. My long hair is evidence of my sincerity and my feminine self-expression."

The High School League's pending policy would compel the school to let this boy play power forward on the girls' basketball team, regardless of safety considerations. (Imagine a Clay Matthews look-alike bowling girls over under the basket.) If the school resisted, it would promptly be faced with a lawsuit under the "will be eligible" clause.

More Dayton excerpts:

"There are kids out there that are struggling with their identities and parents who are struggling with those challenges and I think anyone who would think they would wish this on themselves or their kids is just absolutely ... the embellishment it would take for that far-fetched, absurd, not even hypothetical possibility and turn that into an attack on trying to help some kids who need a chance to be like every other kid in terms of their school activities."

Dayton closed the press conference by saying:

"I just can't comprehend how some people in this state want to spend their time on something that's not obstructive to other people's lives and misstate it in such a way that is hurtful."