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College SHOULD be $10 a credit

These old dudes are using their free time for yet another break, financially. If they're aware how unfair that would seem to most of their fellow students, that's not seen in this NBC News clip.

These old dudes are using their free time for yet another break, financially. If they're aware how unfair that would seem to most of their fellow students, that's not seen in this NBC News clip. NBC News

College is free!*

(*Note: Must have a full-ride scholarship(s), or, at the University of Minnesota, if you're already taking 13 credits* in a given semester, at which point credits are free of charge.)

(Second note: If any of your classes is at all challenging for you or involves a lot of reading or homework, kiss your chance of partying, dating, or keeping up with Game of Thrones sans spoilers goodbye.) 

However. If you're "of a certain age" and have generally been fortunate to live through decade after decade of economic growth in this country, we're pleased to announce you can get one more break, money-wise. (Oh who are we kidding? You'll probably get a bunch more.) 

A report from NBC News' national desk highlights the state of Minnesota's U of M's (see correction below) fun little idea of offering college courses to retirement-age folks for $10 a credit. Honestly we can't hate on these adorable old-timers waxing about expanding their knowledge base. They seem nice.

And who are we to deny them the just rewards they deserve for living through the Great Depression and winning World War II. 

[Googles.]

Hmmm.

Below, meet the beneficiaries of the state's splendid generosity, given the head of steam around the idea of making college free or forgiving some of the student loan debt out there. (There's a lot. Like, $1.5 trillion, roughly equivalent to the annual gross domestic product of Spain.)

See! How could you not like those guys? 

Here's something else you might like: the series of clapback tweet responses pointing out the insanely unfair concept of shockingly cheap education for people who don't really need it, have no plans of entering the workforce, and lived through some of the gentlest economic times in American history.

The one actual student depicted on NBC's upbeat clip about these nice fellows says the old guys are  "just like us," and "there to learn new things." Let's assume, optimistically, others rolled their eyes so hard they've had to visit an optometrist. Or just spit at the camera.

Here's a chart showing what those students pay for tuition, with in-state tuition and costs on the left, and out-of-state on the right:

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Wait, sorry. That's what they have paid. We have some (additional) bad news:

A proposed tuition increase of 2.5 percent for resident undergraduates on the University of Minnesota’s Twin Cities campus will be presented to the Board of Regents for a vote later this month.

Unclear if this 2.5 percent increase means the old guys will have to pay $10.25 next year. As for their fellow students, the ones who actually need these degrees, we wish them the best but frankly they already made a few mistakes, including the desire to learn and being young now instead of 40 years ago. Hopefully they've learned that by the time they leave college.

CORRECTION:This post originally attributed the idea for $10-a-credit tuition to the University of Minnesota. In fact the idea is inscribed in state law. Somehow that makes it... worse? Anyway we regret the error.