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Are you a winner in the Twin Cities' housing market?

This home on Linden Hills Boulevard sold for $284,000 in 1995. It's currently listed for almost $1 million.

This home on Linden Hills Boulevard sold for $284,000 in 1995. It's currently listed for almost $1 million.

Prestigious West Bloomington is no longer prestigious. The average home price still hovers around $350,000. However, homeowners there have actually seen their property values dip by about 1 percent since 2004.

Don't laugh, Eden Prairie. About half of your single-family homes have dropped in value by 2 percent over the last 11 years, though they still average an impressive $426,000.   

The two southwestern suburbs are surprise anomalies in an otherwise steroid Twin Cities real estate market. Well-to-do families continue to move into city centers. Many sellers are making out like bandits. And the numbers prove it. 

According to a Washington Post analysis of real estate markets, large swaths of the City of Lakes and the Capital City continue to be high-demand zip codes like never before.    

Two areas south of I-94 in St. Paul, for example, boast double-digit gains with median home prices vaulting well into the $300k range.  

Across the river, Minneapolis neighborhoods are almost a monopoly of appreciation with the exception of three North Side zip codes. The Post's data shows single-family residences on both sides of 35W continue to be promised lands, rising anywhere from 12 to 18 percent.

The priciest jump comes from the city's southwest corner.

It belongs to the area south of Lake Calhoun and west of Lake Harriet. Zip code 55410 has experienced a 25 percent bump in median values during the last 11 years, climbing to about $408,000.    

The bullish market also extends into some unexpected suburbs.

Roseville single-family pads today, for instance, average $255,000, an 11 percent hike since 2004. That's the same appreciation rate for Wayzata, although its median price is almost $531,000.