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Andrew Engeldinger, Accent Signage shooter, was late to work 35 days straight before rampage

Engeldinger got a stern warning about his chronic tardiness a week before getting fired, but kept showing up late anyway.
Engeldinger got a stern warning about his chronic tardiness a week before getting fired, but kept showing up late anyway.
Submitted image via Fox 9

On the afternoon of September 27, Andrew Engeldinger was told to come to a meeting with Accent Signage manager John Souter. Suspecting what was coming, he went to his car and grabbed his Glock 9mm before reporting to his boss' office.

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After being told he was being fired, Engeldinger went on a rampage that left three wounded and six dead, including Engeldinger himself. On Monday, Accent Signage records released by the Minneapolis Police Department shed more light on the workplace circumstances that culminated in Engeldinger's deadly rampage.

According to company records, Engeldinger was late to work for 35 consecutive days before being canned.

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According to the more than 100-page personnel file, Engeldinger was late to work 35 days in a row in August and September.

On Sept. 20, Accent Signage quality control manager Rami Cooks sent Engeldinger a letter stating that his constant tardiness was a problem that needed to be, quote, "rectified immediately."

The file shows that Engeldinger received a similar letter in 2011 about another string of late arrivals. Manager John Souter also entered several letters going back to 2006 in Engeldinger's file that described incidents where co-workers said he was verbally abusive towards them.

Cooks and Souter were the two Accent Signage bosses in the meeting with Engeldinger the afternoon of September 27, and they were also the first two people Engeldinger shot. Crooks died; Souter was badly injured but survived.

While getting fired appears to have provided some impetus for Engeldinger's rampage, it wasn't the only factor -- his family said he had a history of struggling with mental illness.


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