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Anddi Schwartz brings the party to kids who would've been shorted

The organizer's selfie as her group shipped out 129 birthday kits to kids celebrating another candle.

The organizer's selfie as her group shipped out 129 birthday kits to kids celebrating another candle.

The air was thick, the sunshine in full glory last Friday. A platoon of volunteers descended upon the field of paper grocery bags.

They were there to load 129 birthday kits. The bags, which were filled with cake mix, plates, noisemakers, and all the essentials mandatory for a kid's birthday party, were transported by four vehicles to Keystone Community Services in St. Paul. Staffers at the human services charity would then disseminate the kits to families with a birthday child who otherwise wouldn't have had such a celebration.

Schwartz crushed her original goal of 100 birthday kits.

When it was all tallied, Keystone took in almost 1,200 pounds of bounty.   

Let Them Eat Cake takes the narcissism out of an individual's birthday, transforming it into the selfless. Because "every kid deserves to celebrate their birthday," the group collects donated kids' birthday party wares.

The call goes out from a point person, who's forsaken their own birthday festivities. Instead, they channel that energy into providing party essentials for youngsters whose birthday could handle a festive bump.

All things youngster bash are summoned, from napkins to treat bags, gift cards to games and prizes. The likes of Schwartz cobble the goodies together into birthday kits before handing them off to a charity that will get them into the homes of kids itching to tell the world they're a year older.

Last week's efforts marks the fourth time Schwartz's St. Paul Let Them Eat Cake engineered such an undertaking.

Repeated messages left for Schwartz over the past three days went unreturned. Perhaps she's shunning the spotlight, letting her actions doing the talking.

If that's the case, let's supply the applause right here.  

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