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Al Franken attacks Steve Bannon by quoting real headlines from Breitbart.com

Al Franken is trying to point out Steve Bannon, the guy Donald Trump wants as his right-wing man.

Al Franken is trying to point out Steve Bannon, the guy Donald Trump wants as his right-wing man. Associated Press

The Donald Trump presidency has its first scandal. 

His name is Steve Bannon. 

Soon after Trump's shocking election last week, deflated Democrats found a new issue to rally around.

Despite whatever clickbait your Facebook friends are raving about, liberals can't keep Trump out of the White House. But they might be able to block Bannon. He's the guy who went from running Breitbart.com, once the source of the most Trump-stroking prose outside one of Donald's own books, to actually running the guy's presidential campaign.

Bannon was given credit for managing to keep the previously erratic Trump on-script for days at a time. What was in that script was still troubling: Dog whistles for white folks, anti-immigrant nativism, threats of imminent terror attacks, and criticisms of Hillary Clinton that sounded like questioning whether a woman could handle the job of president. 

Now that that worked, Bannon's in line for a plumb White House gig as Trump's top political strategist and policy adviser. Though Bannon's managed to stay off the radar since joining team Trump back in August, he's got a long track record at his old job, and people are now mining it for reasons he shouldn't be working for American taxpayers.

DFL U.S. Sen. Al Franken is the latest high-profile Democrat to zero in on Bannon's past with Breitbart News, tweeting a graphic filled with headlines published on that news site during Bannon's tenure. 

They're pretty nasty.

In an accompanying short-and-not-sweet statement, Franken says: "Steve Bannon is a disgrace and should never have a place in the White House." 

Franken's sentiment follows on that of DFL U.S. Rep. (and maybe the next Democratic National Committee leader) Keith Ellison, who said earlier this week, "Mr. Bannon is adored by white supremacists, white nationalists, anti-Semites, neo-Nazis, and the KKK. It’s not hard to see why."

In Bannon's defense, Al Franken is Jewish, and Keith Ellison is black and a Muslim.

Admittedly, based on everything he's said and done, Bannon appears to like men, Christians, and white people. Almost exclusively. 

But the straight white guy Bannon loves most of all is Donald Trump. And isn't that all that counts?