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Ticketmaster vouchers don't help Minnesota concertgoers — at least not yet

As of Tuesday, the settlement from a 13-year-old lawsuit against Ticketmaster amounted to diddly for Minnesotans

As of Tuesday, the settlement from a 13-year-old lawsuit against Ticketmaster amounted to diddly for Minnesotans

It's class-action lawsuit Christmas for concertgoers this week. 

Last month's $400 million Schlesinger v. Ticketmaster settlement means nice music fans were awarded vouchers Monday from the naughty ticket giant (see if you scored any by clicking the "Active Vouchers" tab on the "My Account" section of TM's site).

On Tuesday, Ticketmater supplied the list of free concerts — and we use that term lightly, considering the vouchers only exist due to years of screwing over customers — on which you can use the vouchers. 

Of the 428 shows, you've got some great options like Bob Dylan, Alabama Shakes, Snoop Dogg, the Cure, and Hall & Oates, as well as options like ... well, Barenaked Ladies, Bush, and Def Leppard. 

One glaring issue for Minnesota music lovers: None of the eligible shows occur within state borders. Ticketmaster says the list will be updated, so here's hoping Xcel Energy Center and Target Center gigs make the cut. 

But that's not likely. Live Nation Entertainment, which is owned by Ticketmaster, has complete control over the venues for voucher-eligible concerts, according to settlement documents: 

"The events and venues selected will be within Live Nation’s sole discretion and may also include Live Nation clubs such as the House of Blues. Live Nation has the right but not the obligation to make tickets available at venues other than its amphitheaters."

Peruse this nifty voucher FAQ from the New York Times as we await flyover acknowledgement; calls to Ticketmaster were not immediately returned. The settlement, a result of Ticketmaster's "deceptive" fee practices, applies to around 50 million customers who purchased tickets between 1999 and 2013.