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The week's 27 best concerts: May 31-June 6

Girlpool, eating strawberries, it would seem.

Girlpool, eating strawberries, it would seem. Photo by Kacie Tomita.

Rounding up the week's best concerts in the Twin Cities.

Girlpool
7th St. Entry, Wednesday 5.31
Last November, the Fader ran a cover story on Girlpool, calling the Los Angeles duo the future of rock. It was a surprising proclamation considering the band’s relative obscurity and their sound at the time, an intimate take on indie pop featuring just Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad’s raw singing along with minimal guitar and bass playing. A few weeks past the release of their tellingly titled sophomore album, Powerplant, and the hype makes a lot more sense. Though Tucker and Tividad built a considerable fanbase with their first EP and debut LP, they needed to expand or enliven their sound to keep growing. With Powerplant, they did just that, adding grungier riffs, drumming by Miles Wintner, and a wider range of dynamics overall—all of which brings to mind the ’90s heyday of bands like the Breeders and Veruca Salt. If Girlpool’s potential once seemed limited, they’ve since smashed through that ceiling. Ian Sweet and Snailmail open. 18+. 7:30. $16-$18. 701 First Ave. N., Minneapolis. 612-338-8388. —Michael Madden

Chris Potter Quartet
Dakota, Wednesday 5.31
An in-demand sideman for a quarter-century and leader on more than a dozen recordings, tenor saxophonist Chris Potter is also a formidable composer and adept handler of multiple reeds. On his latest album, The Dreamer Is the Dream, he pares down the jazz orchestra of Imaginary Cities, opting this time for an acoustic quartet with longtime associate Joe Martin on double bass, Cuban-born pianist David Virelles, and young rhythm master Marcus Gilmore on drums. Potter opens the title track, a richly melodic jazz ballad, with deeply expressive ruminations on bass clarinet. “Heart in Hand” juxtaposes his moody, yearning tenor with Virelles’ sparkling keys, slowly building in intensity, and “Ilimba” percolates with sizzling African rhythms sparked by the titular thumb piano, later complicated by Gilmore’s solo. Then there’s “Yasodhara,” a scintillating 10-minute ride with echoes of Coltrane, Indian undertones, and marvelous revelations that, like all Potter’s work, compound the visceral and ethereal. $30 at 7 p,m. $20 at 9 p.m. 1010 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis; 612-332-5299. —Rick Mason

  • HA HA TONKA May 31, 7:30 p.m. at Turf Club
  • FREE THROW May 31, 6:00 p.m. at The Garage
  • TAAKE May 31, 7:30 p.m. at Triple Rock Social Club

Boosie Badazz
Privé, Friday 6.1
Hits can be deceiving. See: “Wipe Me Down,” Baton Rouge rapper Boosie Badazz’s nonsensical, fun Top 40 breakthrough from 2007, also featuring Webbie and Foxx. While Boosie would call himself “Mr. Wipe Me Down” for the next couple years, he’s now beloved as a fiery lyricist of pain and paranoia. After becoming a regional icon, Boosie (then Lil Boosie) headed to the Louisiana State Penitentiary, sentenced to eight years after pleading guilty to drug charges. (He was found not guilty in a separate murder case.) Boosie’s musical rebirth started after his early release in 2014 with the mixtape Life After Deathrow, which found him swiftly adapting to the present era of street rap. Following a battle with cancer, he had a prolific 2016, and he’s now gearing up to release his most ambitious project to date, a double album titled BooPac. 21+. 10 p.m. $40-$60. 315 First Ave. N., Minneapolis; 612-444-3322. —Michael Madden

  • JONATHA BROOKE June 1, 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at Dakota Jazz Club & Restaurant
  • HOOPS June 1, 7:30 p.m. at 7th St. Entry
  • DJ MASEO (DE LA SOUL) June 1, 9:00 p.m. at Amsterdam Bar and Hall

Diana Krall
State Theatre, Friday 6.2
Contemporary jazz diva Diana Krall certainly takes the title of her 15th album to heart. Turn Up the Quiet, released earlier this month, is a ringing exercise in hushed, sophisticated, romantic music that speaks loudly to the virtues of muffled intimacy. On Quiet, one of the last projects of producer Tommy LiPuma, who worked frequently with Krall and died in March, Krall returns once more to the Great American Songbook. Her whispery voice and evocative piano conspire in aural seduction, and the languid vocal and enticing arrangement on “Sway” could steam up glasses at a dozen paces. Krall’s silky charm permeates these tunes, etching the intricate obsessions of love on “Night and Day” while a string section sighs in the background, and growing breathless at the prospect of love in “Isn’t It Romantic.” Bassist Christian McBride and guitarist Russell Malone add jaunty rhythms to “Blue Skies,” and guitarist Marc Ribot and fiddler Stuart Duncan lend a hot club vibe to “I’ll See You in My Dreams.” 8 p.m. $66.50-$129. 805 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis; 612-339-7007. —Rick Mason

Joan Shelley
Bryant-Lake Bowl, Friday 6.2
Louisville singer-songwriter Joan Shelley has been compared to indie-folk critical darlings Sharon Van Etten and Laura Marling, but her music is more particularly old-timey in nature. Shelley is steeped in the history of Americana, and she spent some time in the band Maiden Radio, a trio known for covering traditional songs. Shelley’s first widely released solo record was 2014’s Electric Ursa, and her follow-up, Over and Even, included her most popular song, the simply lovely “Stay on My Shore.” That song wasn’t a sellout move, though, and she’s maintained her traditional ways ever since. Her new self-titled album, while produced by Jeff Tweedy, is satisfyingly unfussy. The Wilco leader’s expertise can be heard in the layering of songs like “Where I’ll Find You” and “The Push and Pull,” but the centering of Shelley’s evocative voice and words is the most important part of the album’s appeal. Jake Xerxes Fussell opens. 7 and 10 p.m. $12-$15. 810 W. Lake St., Minneapolis; 612-825-8949. —Michael Madden

  • STEEPLEJACK June 2, 7:00 p.m. at Turf Club
  • ZZ WARD June 2, 8:00 p.m. at Fine Line Music Cafe
  • RODRIGO Y GABRIELA June 2, 8:00 p.m. at First Avenue

Norah Jones
Northrop Auditorium, Saturday 6.3
After more than a decade following country, blues, rock, and other tangents, Norah Jones last fall returned to the sly, sophisticated jazz-pop sound of her alluring debut, 2002’s Come Away With Me, except on the new Day Breaks her approach is deeper and more nuanced. Her piano skills remain supple, and her sultry, intimate voice has acquired subtle new facets: a tinge of irony that underlines a connection to Billie Holiday and a misty quality that adds an insouciant sense of swing on “It’s a Wonderful Time for Love.” On “Burn,” her voice drifts like smoke in a noir setting elegantly sketched by Wayne Shorter’s soprano saxophone, bassist John Patitucci, and drummer Brian Blade. Jones’ solid originals mesh nicely with three covers: Horace Silver’s “Peace,” Ellington’s “Fleurette Africaine,” and Neil Young’s “Don’t Be Denied,” the last tweaked with autobiographical details. Perhaps most interesting is “Flipside,” whose sleek drive rides Dr. Lonnie Smith’s organ while Jones looks for personal resolution amid socio-political chaos. 8 p.m. $58-$71. 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis; 612-625-6600. —Rick Mason

  • THE DAMES June 3, 7:30 p.m. at 7th St. Entry
  • TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS June 3, 8:00 p.m. at Xcel Energy Center
  • ICEHOUSE 5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY: SOLID GOLD AND ABY WOLF June 3, 11:00 p.m. at Icehouse
  • COM TRUISE AND CLARK June 4, 7:00 p.m. at Fine Line Music Cafe
  • BEN NICHOLS (OF LUCERO) June 4, 7:30 p.m. at Turf Club
  • ICEHOUSE 5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY: THE DROPPERS June 4, 7:30 p.m. at Icehouse
  • DIET CIG June 5, 8:00 p.m. at 7th St. Entry
  • OTTMAR LIEBERT AND LUNA NEGRA June 5, 9:00 p.m. at Dakota Jazz Club & Restaurant
  • ICEHOUSE 5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY: JT'S JAZZ IMPLOSION FEATURING JC SANFORD QUARTET June 5, 9:30 p.m. at Icehouse
  • ICEHOUSE 5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY: DOSH AND COLORING TIME June 6, 9:30 p.m. at Icehouse
  • LISSIE June 6, 6:00 p.m. at Icehouse
  • DEAN MAGRAW & DAVU SERU June 6, 7:00 p.m. at Black Dog Cafe