Some Pulp turn Halloween into a PG porno in this week's Top 5 MN music videos

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It’s Halloween, and your man has a full pillow case of music videos.

In the short history of my tenure curating Local Frames, I’ve never seen so many videos landing in my inbox. There were 17 links sent to my Gmail. Unfortunately, I can only share five of those, so I wanted to take a second to thank Local Frames regulars Tufawon, Jack & Kitty, Vicky Emerson, Taylor J, Kind Country, and  the New Granadas, as well as the Heavy Set, J. Bell ‘n’ the Lazy Susan Band, and Black Market Brass for their submissions. Also, a tip of the hat to Strange Relations and Loop Line, who I excluded but can be seen in last week’s Friday Five over at 89.3 the Current.

I will say I wish there was some spookier shit mixed in there, but there’s no better way to celebrate All Hallows' Eve than overindulging, so at least we have that part covered. Unwrap below.

Some Pulp -- “Spooky Kids” (PREMIERE)

Minneapolis death-pop band Some Pulp have been on something of a hiatus, and so their surprise Halloween EP FA666 today was a holiday treat. Over four songs, the Forged Artifacts representatives plumb the sultry and macabre corners of Halloween, making their comeback into an appropriately gloomy expression of youth and mischief.

Lead single “Spooky Kids” also got a visual treatment today courtesy of Gordon Byrd and some very, very horny millennials. Eschewing pumpkins and candy corn for throat-deep tongue kissing, the video for the atmospheric tune is given an extremely visceral grounding. But, as the lips lock, more menacing details come into view, to the point where it’s unclear what the literal make-out bandits are celebrating.

FA666 is free and available on Some Pulp’s Bandcamp.

Lazy Scorsese -- “Soulshaper”

On Friday, far-out Minneapolis folk band Lazy Scorsese released their debut EP, Grigio. To celebrate, they animated a mystical, hypnotic video for “Soulshaper.” Over the song's six-minute run, the photo by Brian Day swirls and morphs, the Glitch’s animations leaving a lasting, unsettling feeling.

Appropriately, the two artists behind the Glitch have never actually met the band, which ties in perfectly with Lazy Scorsese’s origin -- they met randomly off Craigslist before coming together. On Grigio, they celebrate the amorphous and obtuse, the gray between the black and white.

The band, the album, the video -- they’re all built from the intangible.

The Ten Arms -- “Good Morning”

Corpse paint isn’t exactly Halloween-y, but it does feel like a costume when it’s on the face of bedroom folk artist Jonathan Grim, the mind behind Minneapolis’ the Ten Arms. In the video for “Good Morning,” Grim plays a reforming death-metal god, pulling a Richie Tenenbaum and cutting his hair in the mirror. As he goes through the metamorphosis, Grim unsheathes his sorrowful whine.

The song comes from The Ten Arms’ recent EP Songs About Satan, which arrived a week ago to usher in the season. The record contains more of the despondent and wry glimpses into Grim’s life as an artist, which has spanned a handful of projects since he relocated to Minnesota from Iowa.

Songs About Satan isn’t really evil, but it does confront the darkness, which, as “Good Morning” shows, sometimes lives in the mirror.

Humbird -- “August”

Sri Undlin just returned home to Minnesota after a tour of living rooms in the Midwest.

On that journey, Undlin, who sings songs under the moniker Humbird, stopped at Mountain Fold Books in Colorado Springs, where the new video for “August” was created. Filmed by Arielle Mari, the video shows Humbird in the earnest and intimate environs where she flourishes. This is an artist who literally plays potlucks, and hearing her pastoral coo bouncing off books and deep carpet helps you understand how heart-swellingly beautiful her live shows can be.

In the closely framed shoot for "August," you can hear hints of Jewel and Sarah McLaughlin bleed into her song of wonder and exploration.

Kashy -- “Lift Off”

North Dakota’s Kashy breaks bad in the new video for “Lift Off.”

Rappers have long compared their music to crack, but Kashy’s video takes that to an extreme as the manic MC literally cooks his CDs into a narcotic. With bright neon highlights added by 42 Lights Media, Kashy stirs and boils, cooking up a perfect banger in the process.

On the song, Kashy handles both chorus and verse duties, drowning in AutoTune for the party-boy hook and ripping off intricate bars in the body of the track. It almost feels like Kashy is two separate artists, like he’s featuring on his own track. It’s a trippy sensation, but it also might be the dope kicking in.

Dream of seeing your video appear in Local Frames? Email writer Jerard Fagerberg at jgfagerberg@gmail.com. 


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