Bob Dylan won't receive Nobel Prize in person due to 'other commitments'

itemprop

Dylan looking too cool for school in the '80s RPA - Columbia Records

Bob Dylan, you lovable, inscrutable grouch.

Turns out the Minnesota-born music legend won't be traveling to Stockholm on December 10 to accept his 2016 Nobel Prize for literature. 

"[Dylan] wishes he could receive the prize personally, but other commitments make it unfortunately impossible," the prize-awarding Swedish Academy announced Wednesday, following weeks of speculation. Those commitments don't appear to be tour-related, as Dylan's schedule is clear after next week

The Academy did receive "a personal letter" from Dylan that "underlined that he feels extremely honored by the Nobel Prize," Permanent Secretary Sara Danius told Swedish news agency TT on Wednesday. 

The award still "belongs to Bob Dylan," the Academy says, adding that it "respects Bob Dylan's decision" and is "looking forward to Bob Dylan's Nobel lecture, which he must hold, according to the requirements, within six months [of the ceremony]" -- #shade? 

It's unclear who will pick up the award on Dylan's behalf, but more details are excepted Friday, the Associated Press reports. Five other Nobel recipients will be on hand to accept their hardware from Sweden's King Carl XVI Gustaf, who has gotta be bummed about today's news. 

There is some precedent. Austrian playwright/novelist Elfriede Jelinek skipped the ceremony in 2004, citing a personal phobia. Doris Lessing (2007) and Harold Pinter (2005) also did not attend. 

In October, Dylan, 75, became the first musician to ever win the Nobel Prize for literature, based on the merits of "having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition." 

Then came weeks of silence, frustration from the Academy, trademark obliqueness from Dylan, and, finally, today's revelation. Click here for a complete timeline of Dylan's wacky Nobel Prize saga. 

Anyway, enjoy this classic AP photo of President Barack Obama bestowing the Presidential Medal of Freedom upon Dylan in 2012, when Bob's calendar must have been less packed. 


Sponsor Content