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The Dream Syndicate

Dec. 5
7 p.m.
$25-$40
Rock

With Elephant Stone.

PROMOTIONAL EVENT DESCRIPTION The Dream Syndicate at the Fine Line

 

Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at 7:00pm
$25.00 advance | $40.00 reserved balcony seating
18+ Fine Line
About: Shuffling, playlisting and cherry-picking your favourite songs is all well and good, but sometimes you can’t beat sitting down with an album and playing it from start to finish. An album that sounds like it was recorded in one room, with the same group of people and that perfectly captures a specific moment in time.
Jake Bugg’s last album, 2016’s On My One, was a dizzyingly eclectic collection of styles and sounds, but for the follow up, the 23-year–old wanted something that felt like the LPs that took pride of place in his own record collection. Albums take you into their own, sealed world. “On the last album it was fun to experiment with different instruments and writing styles,” reflects Bugg. “But this time around I just wanted to make a complete record as opposed to a collection of songs. Just write the tunes and record them with great musicians.”

 

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 |  Fine Line | 7:00pm | $25 advance | $40 reserved balcony seating | 18+ 

The Dream Syndicate with Elephant Stone

About: Like a lot of bands and other incendiary devices, the Dream Syndicate began in a basement. In the final days of 1981, Dennis Duck, known in the LA scene as the drummer of post-punk stalwarts Human Hands, met up in Los Angeles for a subterranean rehearsal with Steve Wynn (guitar, vocals), Karl Precoda (guitar) and Kendra Smith (bass), three scruffy and noisy kids of no particular renown.

Despite mostly consisting of long jams on CCR's version of "Susie Q" and a few embryonic Wynn compositions, the rehearsal left the quartet feeling they were on to something that, if nothing else, was the sound they had been seeking and most certainly not finding on the local scene. That sound was long songs of feedback and drone and psychedelic rave ups centered around cheap guitars plugged into broken amps. Guitars! Long Songs! Psychedelic garage music (well, basement, technically) -not things that were in fashion at that moment of time.

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