Matthew Wilder

Latest Stories

  • Made in 1926 by a very young Alfred Hitchcock, this silent treatment of the Jack the Ripper story is the Hitch film most driven by the Master's unconscious of any except Vertigo--which is not to say that it's good. It is, in fact, almost...

  • The town of Santa Rosa, sleepy and soft-edged, has a wistful, evergreen quality in the opening scenes of this 1943 genre-bender from Alfred Hitchcock. Young Charlie (Teresa Wright) sprawls on her bed, hands behind her head, dreaming of a place...

  • If reviewing movies was jury duty, I'd be kicked out of the courtroom: This picture has an unavoidably special power for anyone who grew up in Chicago in the late Seventies and early Eighties. Seen decades later, it still impresses for the simple...

  • 4 years ago | Film and TV

    One of the joys of early talkies comes in witnessing film artists make up the rules of how big-screen dialogue ought to sound. Often alternating between the stagy, the realistically offhand, and the downright empty, American movies of this period ...

  • 6 years ago | Film and TV

    How are we supposed to respond to Kubrick's most problematic movie (1971) so many years after its release? Should we be repulsed by it as an outpouring of pestered-geek, Dylan Klebold-like misanthropy, where the hermitic auteur identifies with the...

  • 6 years ago | Film and TV

    In the early 1960s, Norman Mailer's essay "The White Negro" hit an American cultural phenomenon square on the nose: the alienated white hipster's feeling of envy for dispossessed black people. Since then, White Negroes have filled the landscape, f...