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This week's must-see art shows

Mayumi Amada

Mayumi Amada Mayumi Amada

The end of summer is upon us, but there's no reason to feel blue. There's lots of great art events to celebrate summer's end and amp us up for the hard-hitting exhibitions and shows that come in the fall. Whether you're stockpiling art supplies, trying your hand at chalk art, or taking in some of the art this summer has to offer, treat yourself with some beauty and fun before the wind changes.

 

Caitlin Karolczak

Art Unloaded: End of Summer Art & Supply Sale

Where it's at: Public Functionary, 1400 12th Ave. NE, Minneapolis.

What it's about: Public Functionary is cleaning out its closets to make way for fall by holding a sale of artsy supplies and accruements and inviting their artist friends to do the same. Among the items for sale are T-shirts, supplies, and discounted prints, plus treasures from talents such as Caitlin Karolczak, Kate Iverson, Michael Cina, and Michael Thomsen.

Why you should go: Everybody loves a garage sale, but Public Functionary is taking it to another level, with all the art supplies an artist could want, plus unique art finds as well. Not only that, but there'll be snacks and beverages, and music by DJ Egypt Knuckles (a.k.a. PF board member extraoridnaire, Ali Elabbady).

When: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

 

The Chalk Walk Art Festival

Where it's at: Harrison Park, 1518 Fifth Ave. N., Minneapolis.

What it's about: This event gathered so much interest that they actually had to move to a new location to accommodate the number of people that plan to show up. The excitement? Chalk, of course. Lots of it. With amazing chalk artists on hand, plus opportunities for anybody that wants to join in, it'll be a day full of ephemeral art, music, performances, and food and drink.

Why you should go: Chalk drawings are special for both kids and adults. It's one of the most simple pleasures; to create drawings on the sidewalk that, yes, will be washed away in the rain, but are oh so wonderful when they are first created. 

When: Noon to 6 p.m. Saturday.

 

Still the Night: Ute Bertog/Freeze & Thaw: Betsy Ruth Byers

 

Where it's at: Rosalux Gallery, 1400 Van Buren St. NE, Ste. 195, Minneapolis.

What it's about: Rosalux Gallery has got two solo shows for your viewing pleasure. In Ute Bertog's "Still the Night," the artist looks into the process of listening as she re-contextualizes chance encounters, found materials, and language through painting. Betsy Ruth Byers, meanwhile, ponders the relationship between our bodies and transient landscapes with "Freeze and Thaw," creating sensual experiences of landscape through abstract paintings.

Why you should go: While the topics that Ute Bertog and Betsy Ruth Byers explore differ, both artists use abstract painting as a way to examine complex ideas about how we exist and move through the world. Their work offers a kind of philosophical inquiry, experienced not literally, but through the lively interplay of a viewer taking in a piece of artwork.

When: There will be a public reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday; the exhibition runs through August 28.

 

Katayoun Amjadi 

"Life/Identity/Existence/All or Nothing": Artists' Talk

Where it's at: 801 Washington Lofts, 801 Washington Ave. N., Minneapolis.

What it's about: The four artists featured in "Life/Identity/Existence/All of Nothing," at 801 Washington Lofts, are gathering together to have a discussion about their work. Katayoun Amjadi explores themes of identity, perception, and interconnection. Qian Lu's work takes on the self-destructive nature of relationships. Jane Powers has a fascination with the biomedical field. Japanese installation artist Mayumi Amada's work delves into intergenerational roles of women. This Sunday, they will converge for a discussion about their art and processes.

Why you should go: Get a glimpse into the artist process, as these four artists offer up their thoughts on how they create work and what they are trying to say. You'll be able to check out this ethereal show and probe the artists about how they interpret the world.

When: 2-4 p.m. Sunday.