Badass Design Bitches Collective fights street harassment one sticker at a time

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Some examples of some of the stickers you might see soon. BDxBC

Danielle Attinella has had enough with street harassment, and she’s ready to do something about it. A resident of the Whittier neighborhood in Minneapolis, she’s been harassed many times, and even had one man follow to her house.

Her friends have similar complaints. One friend of hers was listening to headphones in downtown Minneapolis, which angered a man who was trying to get her attention. He then told his friend that he’d pay him $300 to beat her up.

As frustrating as the harassment is, Attinella and her friends were struck by how often passersby didn’t say anything. The tendency is just to look away. “A lot of people witness behavior, but no one wants to get involved,” she says.

Attinella decided to take action. An artist and designer, she put together a Facebook group to brainstorm ideas about raising awareness about the issue of street harassment.

So they formed the Badass Design Bitches Collective (BDXBC). The group began with 40 friends, but quickly expanded to about 100 people. At first, members were mostly female-identified, but now it's open to anyone who experiences street harassment.  

Attinella came up with a plan to solicit designs that spoke out about the issue. She started a Gofundme campaign to pay for materials, and began reaching out to businesses around the Twin Cities who will help distribute a collection of free stickers the Collective puts together.

“I wanted to get people who deal with this harassment and intimidation together to make something and have it be our voices,” she says.

Submissions are open until October 1, so if you have an idea, you can still send it in. Ideally, each box filled with stickers at various locations will have multiple designs for free.

“It’s so hard to have one simple message,” Attinella says. “Even saying this is a female collective, I realized I wasn’t being inclusive. Gender minority groups are harassed, too.” The idea is to have a plethora of messages, with a mix of artsy designs and ones that get straight to the point.

Designs submitted so far include an image of a female wearing headphones, one with a kitschy middle finger with nail polish on it, and an image with a cat-style eye that says “Beware the Feminist.”

Attinella’s own designs are more direct, such as a sign that says “Cat Call-Free Zone.”

Look for the BDXBC Collective stickers at a neighborhood business near you starting later this month.


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