Veronica Mars gets Kickstarted into adulthood

The crowd-sourced movie is made for the fans and by the fans, sort of

Not everyone has to like Rob Thomas's Veronica Mars, the feature-length incarnation of his much-loved television series, which ran from 2004 to 2007. But the fans who helped finance the movie, via a ferociously successful 2013 Kickstarter campaign, have every reason to like it: It's been crafted affectionately for them, bringing back nearly every original cast member and, instead of lifting the characters out of amber and trying to jolt their stories back to life, treating them like actual human beings who have gone on living while we weren't looking.

When we last saw Kristen Bell's Veronica Mars, she was still a teenage detective in the small, moneyed Southern California town of Neptune. Now she's a bona fide adult just out of law school and eager to start a new career in New York. Ten years out of high school, she has no intention of going back for the planned reunion, even though it would give her a chance to visit her father, Keith Mars (Enrico Colantoni). Keith, a onetime Neptune sheriff, raised Veronica largely by himself: Her mother, a troubled woman with a drinking problem, skipped out on the family after Keith was run off the job for being principled. At that point, Veronica, who used to be part of the town's in crowd, was demoted to loser status, but that demotion also led her to develop surprisingly sophisticated investigative skills — on the series, she put those to use in solving the murder of her best friend, making her father proud.

Veronica wants nothing to do with Neptune now. She's living with the sweet-natured but (still) clearly not-right-for-her Stosh "Piz" Piznowski (Chris Lowell), who has been in love with her since the two were teenagers. And she's seemingly forgotten her volatile and complex on-again, off-again ex-boyfriend, Logan (Jason Dohring). The key word is "seemingly": When Veronica learns that Logan is a suspect in the death of his rock-star girlfriend, she senses something isn't right and books a plane ticket home.

Kristen Bell is back as Veronica Mars
Robert Voets, Warner Bros. Entertainment
Kristen Bell is back as Veronica Mars

The elaborate plotting isn't the film's strongest feature. I suspect that anyone unfamiliar with the show might get tangled up in the threads that Thomas and his co-writer, Diane Ruggiero, spin out. But as with all great TV shows, on Veronica Mars, the really interesting things were all happening in the margins, and here, Thomas, Ruggiero, and the cast make the most of every available corner. Logan is now in the military, a pretty wild choice for a spoiled rich kid. But, thank God, Thomas understands the distinction between what's believable and what's realistic. In movie terms, Logan's choice is believable, especially when we see him in uniform. He meets Veronica at the airport in his dress whites, and though she can't resist making an Officer and a Gentleman wisecrack (who could?), he's so tall and solemn and quietly lovestruck that we can see her going weak at the knees.

But it's the reunion between Colantoni and Bell that proves the movie's most gratifying element. The Keith-Veronica dynamic was one of the great father-daughter relationships of modern storytelling, a sturdy meshwork of mutual protectiveness, respect, and affection. Bell and Colantoni easily pick up where they left off in 2007.

Seven years after the demise of the show, Bell is more grown-up and definitely curvier — she's like a real person, only better looking — and her timing is more playful and precise than ever. Colantoni, who may be best remembered by movie audiences as Thermian leader Mathesar in the superb sci-fi spoof Galaxy Quest, is an extraordinarily subtle actor, which may be why he made such a good TV dad for Veronica. The nuances of their relationship carry over into this new iteration of Veronica Mars. If you've never seen the show, it's a great excuse for binge-watching. And if you loved the show, the movie is a welcome homecoming. It has the feeling of a story that has been, against all odds, loved into existence. Probably because that's exactly what it is.

 
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10 comments
Debi Jacovetz
Debi Jacovetz

So great to see everyone, but there is never enough Mac and Wallace. The movie tied up a lot of loose ends, but it left a lot of unanswered questions, too--3 seasons and a movie and 6 more seasons? Please? Pretty please? :-)

Lily Frenette
Lily Frenette

It was so great! I'm so happy we finally got some closure.

Paul Peterson
Paul Peterson

I just want to know when Veronica Mars 2: The Rise of Piz comes out.

kabrillowski
kabrillowski

I thought it was pretty good it helped with closure on the series but left room to grow yoo...good nods to people who know the series but my friend who didn't know the series liked it as well!

Jill Galles
Jill Galles

It maybe wasn't everything that I wanted, but it was definitely everything that I needed after how the series ended. I definitely left wanting to know what happens next.

Shannon Troy Jones
Shannon Troy Jones

It never could have lived up to all my hopes and dreams, but it was a satisfying reunion. Odd to see it in a mixed crowd of fans and bewildered newcomers. It definitely carries a lot of history with it that would be difficult for the unfamiliar to absorb in 2 hours.

Glen Herrington-Hall
Glen Herrington-Hall

As a fan I thoroughly enjoyed it. If I'd never seen the TV show, I'm sure I'd wonder what I'd just walked in on.

Mike Green
Mike Green

As a firefly fan I cant tell you how jealous and happy i am for you veronica mars fans.

 

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