Diana Krall

For most of her highly successful career, singer and pianist Diana Krall has focused on jazz standards, only rarely straying elsewhere (reputedly at the urging of hubby Elvis Costello). But on last fall's T Bone Burnett-produced Glad Rag Doll, she ranged much farther afield, both backward — covering now-obscure 1920s and '30s pop tunes she knew from her dad's 78s collection — and forward to Americana folk and blues elements. Still, there's a Jazz Age feel to the album that's reportedly carried over to her live show, featuring scalloped stage lights and vintage film clips from the vaudeville era. Krall's voice is sly and sensuous throughout, getting downright sultry on tunes like "There Ain't No Sweet Man That's Worth the Salt of My Tears," which gets a kick from a gutbucket beat and Marc Ribot's nasty electric guitar. She's more wistful and intimate on other vintage material like the gently swinging "Just Like a Butterfly That's Caught in the Rain" and on the whispery, reflective title cut, accompanied only by Ribot's acoustic. Krall's piano work is impressive too, as she dips into stride and barrelhouse, as well as stirring up some Jerry Lee Lewis-like rock 'n' roll on blues singer Betty James's "I'm a Little Mixed Up." Another more modern tune, Doc Pomus's "Lonely Avenue," gets a striking noirish, almost surreal treatment; like the rest of the album it suggests a certain era while transcending time.
Sun., April 28, 7:30 p.m., 2013

 
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