Federico Fellini: Beauty in the Mire

In the history of cinema very few of even the most influential filmmakers can boast of having had their name be adopted as an adjective to convey a specific style. Such is the case with "Felliniesque," a term invented to suggest a free association of dreamlike fantasies with mundane reality. While the heady combination has long confounded more literal-minded cinema-goers, Italian director Federico Fellini viewed his signature approach as an expression of the human experience, arguing that our impressions of the immediate moment are continually being reshaped by lingering memories and unyielding desires. Over the next four weeks, Fellini's idiosyncratic visions can be seen in all their cinematic glory thanks to Federico Fellini: Beauty in the Mire, the latest retrospective screened by Take-Up Productions at Trylon Microcinema. Coinciding with the 2013 Italian Film Festival, the screenings begin with La Dolce Vita (1960), in which an aspiring writer is torn between hedonistic pleasures and spiritual cravings (an unfair contest when hedonism involves frolicking in Rome's Trevi Fountain with blond bombshell Anita Ekberg). The retrospective continues with the comic drama of wayward youth I, Vitelloni (1953); the nostalgic satire of village life in 1930s Italy, Amarcord (1973); and the dazzling deconstruction of inspiration and the creative process, 8 ½ (1963). Throughout, Fellini depicts our everyday existence as a mysteriously extraordinary experience. Films screen Fridays through Sundays through April; check take-up.org for showtimes.
Fridays-Sundays. Starts: April 5. Continues through April 28, 2013

 
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