The Lynn on Bryant blends elegance and coziness

Too many choices may leave diners feeling braised and confused

The little caveats keep coming. Reservations are accepted in the dining room, except on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, when it isn't open for dinner. At weekend brunch you can order off the brunch or breakfast menu in either dining room, but there's no lunch on the weekend. Is your head spinning a little? I understand and appreciate the divided-dining concept in theory, but in practice it's confusing territory. I get the sense it will be quite some time before guests know where they'd like to go without needing a long explanation from the host.

One of the far clearer and easier-to-appreciate intentions of the Lynn's co-owners, Jay Peterson and chef Ireland, is a commitment to sourcing protein and produce only from local farms. Both men are farm-raised themselves, and it shows in everything they do here, from the use of reclaimed barn wood in their stunning interior design to their plan of offering heat-and-eat takeaway meals, seasonally inspired and designed to order.

The Lynn on Bryant co-owners chef Peter Ireland and Jay Peterson
EU Photography
The Lynn on Bryant co-owners chef Peter Ireland and Jay Peterson

In the end, I think it's better to risk a little confusion and retain the ability to create different experiences for different kinds of diners, because there's absolutely no identity crisis with the food. In fact, the whole operation's point of view is communicated incredibly well through its branding. I haven't seen such appealing, consistent, evocative design across all a restaurant's physical and online platforms since the Bachelor Farmer. My guess is that the Lynn will adapt over time to the demands of its regular diners, and hey, as long as they have somewhere to go for both wine and coffee, they may not be at all overwhelmed by the paradox of choice.

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2 comments
Derrick49
Derrick49

Jeez. I like to patronize our local establishments. But...after stopping by the other day these folks must think their little eatery is located downtown, or in the rich part of Minnetonka. 

The portions were minimal, and the price astronomical. A $20 breakfast and I left still hungry. Let me repeat that. I spent $20 on breakfast - seriously? I'll NEVER be taking my family there (unless I win the lottery), I can't afford to spend a weeks grocery budget on one outing. 

I don't understand why people think it's a grand idea to open these fancy restaurants in middle class neighborhoods.

There is a reason "The Malt Shop" has lasted so long - good food - good portions - reasonable prices.

Next time I go out for breakfast I'll be headed west on 50th to Perkins.

DickersonBigHerb
DickersonBigHerb

$11 omelet and $6 pancake?  No.  Nothing is that good.  Done.

 
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