Rush Limbaugh loses ad over slut comment

Select Comfort pulls the plug

Plymouth-based Select Comfort decided to pull its ads from the Rush Limbaugh program following the conservative shock jock's controversial comments regarding Sandra Fluke, a Georgetown University law student who testified before Congress in support of the Obama administration's requirement that health insurance plans cover contraceptives for women.

The company, which makes Sleep Number beds, posted on its Facebook page that, "Due to recent commentary by Rush Limbaugh that does not align with our values, we've made the decision to immediately suspend all advertising on that program."

Select Comfort's decision came days after Limbaugh characterized Fluke as a "slut" and "prostitute" because she argued during her testimony that Georgetown should have to include contraception as part of the school-offered health care plan.

Reaction to the announcement was mixed, with some going so far as saying they'll never buy another Select Comfort product because of the company's decision to cut ties with Rush.

During her testimony, Fluke said some of her female colleagues spend up to $3,000 a year for various forms of birth control, which aren't covered in the health care plans offered by the school to students.

On Saturday, Rush posted an apology on his website, writing that he "did not mean a personal attack on Ms. Fluke" and regrets "the insulting word choices."

Don't feed the legislators

In a video that was posted to the official YouTube channel for the MNGOP House caucus, Rep. Mary Franson, R-Alexandria, compares food stamp recipients to wild animals.

She later tweeted an apology for her comments and had the video removed, but the clip is preserved in the internet fossil record.

First elected in 2010, Franson supports reducing the amount of time Minnesotans can stay on welfare from five to three years. "I believe that we can get Minnesota's poorest of the poor back up on their feet and moving toward a prosperous future," she says in the video.

As criticism mounted, Franson remained defiant. She tweeted that "The goal should be to get people OFF WELFARE instead #DFL brag about how many are on and needing to outreach for more."

But not long after, she reversed course and tweeted an apology: "For those offended at the video, I deeply apologize. I have asked for the video to be taken down."

That didn't go far enough for the liberal Alliance for a Better Minnesota, which started a petition drive demanding Franson post another YouTube video apologizing for her "hurtful and insensitive comments."

White Power vs. White Powder

It probably wasn't the sort of showing members of the Supreme White Alliance had in mind, but really, what did they expect?

Eleven members of the white supremacist group took part in a march in downtown Duluth on Saturday morning, only to be vastly outnumbered by counter-protesters, some of whom eventually pelted the white supremacists with snowballs. (Four anti-racists were arrested on disorderly conduct charges.)

Members of the Supreme White Alliance marched to protest to the Un-Fair Campaign's controversial "It's hard to see racism when you're white" billboards, which have been visible around Duluth since January. A statement posted on the SWA's homepage last week says the Un-Fair Campaign "has plastered advertisments [sic] all over [Duluth] basically telling white people that they are automatically racist because they are white."

The march was over quickly. A half-hour after the white supremacists were met downtown by about 200 snowball-throwing counter-protesters, police escorted the Alliance members into Duluth City Hall amid chants of, "Run and hide, go inside."

 
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