Is Anne Marie Rasmusson too hot to have a driver's license?

Her photo was the honeypot local law enforcement couldn't resist

The punishments varied wildly by department. Minneapolis didn't discipline any of the 24 officers who looked up Rasmusson's record. St. Paul absolved four of its officers, and is still considering discipline for 38 more.

Burnsville Police Chief Robert Hawkins decided to deal with the matter without formal discipline. "There was no ill will, no maliciousness," he says. "The officers understood what was done was wrong."


In the back room of a restaurant in St. Paul, Rasmusson sits in the crook of a corner booth so she can face the door. She didn't want to come here—it's a cop restaurant.

Rasmusson and her ex-husband bonded over their shared law enforcement career, until her unexpected medical retirement in 2003
Rasmusson and her ex-husband bonded over their shared law enforcement career, until her unexpected medical retirement in 2003
Rasmusson began isolating herself more and more, eventually moving to a remote bungalow on 160 acres of farmland.
Rasmusson began isolating herself more and more, eventually moving to a remote bungalow on 160 acres of farmland.

"I'm the one who snitched in their eyes," she says. "They know me, but I don't know who they are."

These trips to the city are necessary now that she has been meeting with attorneys. She takes some precautions—she wears her old wedding band and engagement ring to keep people from thinking she lives alone. Her BMW sedan happens to be in the shop, so she made the trip down in a loaner without worrying about her plates being run.

Seated in between two grim-faced attorneys busily taking notes on yellow legal pads, Rasmusson looks even smaller. She says she's doing slightly better. She feels safer in her home now, with the addition of a gate and security system, plus a new puppy named Brick who over the next year will grow into a formidable guard dog.

She's stopped worrying about the damage her impending lawsuit is going to have on the cops' careers.

"I had a sense of, like, feeling responsible, thinking, 'Well, what if someone loses their job?'" she says. "I'm over feeling guilty for their actions. I didn't do anything to deserve it. They chose to use tools that were available to them for improper reasons."

Unauthorized look-ups of her record have slowed to a trickle. Only one new agency has been added to the pile since August 2011: the Hennepin County Sheriff's Department. The circumstances are still under investigation. 

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