Fritz Lang: Black Like My Soul

Of all the figures to dwell in the sinister underbelly of film noir, Austrian-born director Fritz Lang seemed eerily at ease in the seedy wasteland of duplicitous relationships, ruinous temptations, and inescapable alienation. Though moral desolation had emerged in Lang's earliest films—including his expressionist landmark, Metropolis (1927)—it was M (1931) that really demonstrated a mastery of using paranoiac visions to induce a sense of impending doom. In a sense, M plays like a prototype for the unabashedly dark storylines that Lang would imagine after fleeing Nazi Germany and finding refuge in Hollywood. The feverish works he created during his Hollywood years (roughly 1936 to 1957) rival the most riveting in the noir canon, depicting murderous figures that conspire in the bleakest corners of society, seducing the foolish with malicious intent and craven desperation. Rendering each shot with ominous suggestion, Lang used his camera to invoke a world in which there is no innocence, only degrees of complicity. Lang's criminally entertaining landscape is the subject of the latest collaboration between Take-Up Productions and the Heights Theater. Fritz Lang: Black Like My Soul offers five of the director's most gripping works, including Ministry of Fear (1944), Scarlet Street (1945), Human Desire (1954), The Woman at the Window (1944), and The Big Heat (1953). For a tour of noir's nefarious netherworld, look no further than the director who dared to map the terrain. (Pictured:Scarlet Street)
Mondays, 7:30 p.m. Starts: Jan. 30. Continues through Feb. 27, 2012

 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Minnesota Concert Tickets
Loading...