The Trial of Ebenezer Scrooge

Though the famous finale of Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol remains one of the (SPOILER ALERT!) most heartwarmingly redemptive in stage history, who in the audience hasn't, in fleetingly cynical moments, questioned the permanence of Scrooge's enlightenment? Sure, Dickens's narrative attests that Scrooge held true to the Christmas spirit for the remainder of his days, but considering his miserly history, isn't it conceivable he would have suffered the occasional moral lapse? Had an unkind thought from time to time? Perhaps even experienced some petty vindictiveness toward spirits who essentially terrified him into changing his wayward ways? According to playwright Mark Brown, Scrooge did, in fact, embark on one last curmudgeonly act, although his surreptitious motives couldn't exactly be attributed to greed. Summoning witnesses from the original work, including Bob Cratchit, nephew Fred, and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, this unofficial sequel questions the cost charged for merely one day of goodwill. While overprotective fans might take issue with its basic premise, Brown's work has already won over audiences with its whimsical riffing on A Christmas Carol's humanitarian themes. The project also serves as ideal material for Open Window Theatre, a relatively new company committed to producing family-friendly works with a strong emotional drive. Here's hoping Tiny Tim didn't speak too soon.
Wednesdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 2 p.m. Starts: Dec. 2. Continues through Dec. 30, 2011

 
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