North Minneapolis tornado victims have been forgotten

Officials moved on, but neighborhood never got help

Frustrated by the lack of help from the powers that be, Anthony and Shemeika moved back into their apartment building, at their landlord's urging, two months after the tornado. Anthony became the building's de facto superintendent and custodian, installing new windows and doors himself, and salvaging anything from the building that hadn't been looted following the forced eviction.

Clothing, CDs, and a TV were lost to vandals. The five minutes that police had given them to vacate the building wasn't enough time to secure their valuables.

"We're using our Social Security money to buy back those household items," said Anthony. "It's gonna be a tough Christmas."

"Response worse than Katrina."

Mark N. Kartarik
DeWayne Thornton and his family stayed in their home, which was condemned by the city even though it was structurally sound
Mark N. Kartarik
DeWayne Thornton and his family stayed in their home, which was condemned by the city even though it was structurally sound

Pauline Turner owns the dubious distinction of surviving two natural disasters that were followed by controversial relief efforts. She lived in Woodville, Mississippi, in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf Coast. Turner was able to remain in her home but was cut off from sources of employment and food. Instead, she survived off the services provided by FEMA.

"There were FEMA tents everywhere: You could go to the Red Cross, or get food stamps, or mental help—whatever you needed," Turner recalls while taking a drag from a cigarette. "But here the food stamps were only for those who were already receiving them. They should have had boxes of food here for us."

Looking haggard and exhausted in clothes that appear too big for her, Turner says she's considering giving up on Minneapolis and moving back to the Gulf Coast.

"They gave us sandwiches and a pat on the back and left."

For a month after the tornado, Leonard Searcy, his mother, and his kids continued to live in a house on Knox and Lowry, even though the windows were broken and the gas was turned off. Their landlord forced Searcy's mom to pay rent, under threat of court action.

"Not only was [the delinquent landlord] an injustice to us, but to this neighborhood," says the 22-year-old, who describes how he and his mother boiled water on the stove to wash themselves.

Searcy says the city, the county, and the nonprofits established to serve north Minneapolis also failed him and his family. "The individual aid never came through. But the money was given to nonprofits that came here and gave us sandwiches and a pat on the back and then left."

The landlord finally kicked them out of the house in September, Searcy says, after the city pressured him to make the necessary repairs. "He wanted us out so he wouldn't have to fix the place. He knows that north Minneapolis is changing, and if he sits on the house, its value is gonna rise."

With nowhere else to go, Searcy, his mom, and the kids now live with his sister in a house on Herschel Street near University Avenue in St. Paul. The neighborhood is completely new to him since he had never lived anywhere but north Minneapolis. Fifteen people now share that home: four adults and 11 kids. The house has four bedrooms, but in actuality, nearly every inch of available space is used for sleeping quarters. When he's not working a third shift processing film at a job in New Brighton, Searcy shares a couch with his three-year-old son and one-year-old daughter.

He worries about the children, who have had to move four times since the tornado, and alternate between their mother in Coon Rapids and wherever Searcy is staying at the time.

"There's no structure in their lives," he says. "Lots of construction and deconstruction has gotten the kids off balance."

The kids are also noticeably scared whenever inclement weather approaches. They think the tornado is returning to hurt them.

"I try to calm them and tell them that weather patterns are different, but they're afraid of dark clouds."

"This was two weeks after the tornado, and they're worried about deck railings."

When Marie and Michael Porter bought a house with a hot tub in the bedroom in March, for just $45,000, they thought they'd hit the jackpot. Two months later, the north Minneapolis tornado uprooted the big walnut tree in their backyard and threw it into the house, lifted the roof and dropped it back down, and sent three of the neighbor's trees through the walls like spears. One tree landed in the cats' litter box. The Porters hadn't even finished moving in when the storm struck.

On Sunday, May 22, Marie, a cookbook author and native of Winnipeg, Canada, and Michael, a technician at Boston Scientific, were in nearby Brooklyn Park when they received a call from their alarm company that there was reportedly a fire in their basement. Worried about the four cats, they hurried home only to realize that it wasn't a fire, but a tornado that had descended on their neighborhood. They were able to drive within three blocks of their house, then sprinted the rest, scrambling over downed trees, branches, and power lines.

And that was only the beginning of the nightmare.

"The city has been so blazingly incompetent, it's like they're working against progress in north Minneapolis," says Marie. "I've had to fight with them repeatedly."

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
26 comments
Roger
Roger

What a shame that the City of Mpls. continues to ignore North Mpls. After downtown Mpls., North Mpls. was the next place you'd want to live. My grandfather had his business in North Mpls for 40 yrs. He was an officier of 1st Mpls.Bank (now USBank) on Fremont and Bdwy. He was a personal friend of Theodor Wirth (Wirth Park). He raised his 2 daughters in North Mpls. My father had his business in North Mpls. for 40 yrs. He was a officier of the American Legion on Penn and Bdwy. for 46 yrs. I had my 1st job at Thriftway, on Bdwy. North Mpls. was the place to shop if you didn't want to go downtown Mpls. North Commons park was the main event for 4th of July, put on by the American Legion. North Mpls. was a very classy region of Mpls. For some reason downtown decided to let this area of the city go in the S--Can. Funny how some areas of Mpls. have always prospered yet No. Mpls. was ignored, once again. Shame on you for continuing to fester this wound.

mark lowry
mark lowry

I didn't get past the sub title "six months after the tornado, north Minneapolis residents still haven't gotten help" and I was ticked off. Remember Katrina, people sitting on their roofs with signs that read "save us"? If you sit on your rear and wait for someone to help you, one might expect to wait a long time... Get off your rear and help your self!

Guest
Guest

Look into Katrina a little more. Good hardworking people own cars and can and deserve to drive away from disasters. The rest, that is people who were not stranded on their roof tops waving sings like lazy bums because they didnt want to swim with their children and elders through the swamp of toxic human waste, went to the Metrodome and were left there without food and water, sitting comfortably on their rear in the Louisiana sun just waiting for someone else to do something. Those who tried to walk out of the city, those without children or elders, were turned back at gun point.CBS has a whole story about the Gretna bridge. Dont take my word for it, check it out yourself. Dont sit on your rear and listen to everything the radio says, get off your rear and educate yourself. I hope God spares you the suffering of having everything destroyed and then having others criticize you for your actions during a time of crisis. It's called solidarity, not charity.

mark lowry
mark lowry

I don't think I need to look into it...I'm already off my rear, working 3 part time jobs, going to school, taking care of my kids, etc. I don't buy the god thing and if you do, we're all better off dead and with god anyway. Personally, I believe the Darwin thing, and if "society" didn't make it so easy for people to not take care of themselves, the gene pool would have already been relieved of their presence. I'm sure that sounds cold and callous and it is, as is life and reality after there is no one left to pick up the piece for you...there is just you.

Gronchbove
Gronchbove

In any other country in the world, the people must fend for themselves. In the Greek - Roman - British - American world, the government takes everything people own and then tells us we must "ask their permission to live." Permit to paint, permit to burn trash, permit to drive, forced to buy insurance, forced to buy health care - most people are out of money. Mr. Mark Lowry, can you out-run or out-drive a tornado? A real community "works" together to solve problems. When an Edina resident has a hang nail, the chief of police calls an emergency. When a tornado destroys North Minneapolis, the police go to their homes in Edina and ignore the community they are paid to serve. Plenty of people in North Minneapolis work three part-time jobs, the majority are middle class. Remember, Mark Lowry, in the Christian-American society, the poor, hard-working bail out the wealthy bankers. Don't you think that is as bad as a crime as the destruction of North Minneapolis?

Mark Lowry
Mark Lowry

I'm not bitter, it sounds like you are making assumptions. I don't think the people who know me would consider me "small." I can be very generous and helpful to my friends and family. Your take on evolution and survival are very different from mine. Sometimes a limb must be sacrificed to save the body as it were. Not every life is worthy...Some people are such a detriment to society that they should be eliminated. Some contribute so little they should simply be allowed to fend for themselves. Like a parent sometimes must stop bailing out their child when they get in trouble, or a spouse needs to stop enabling an alcoholic wife or husband. To realize...reality...is not the same as being without compassion.

Susan
Susan

I feel sorry for you - you sound like a bitter, small man. We are social animals, and we survive by helping each other. That's our evolutionary adaptation. You sound like you may have stayed back in the ocean while the rest of us learned to walk. The hatred of those less fortunate than ourselves is usually a fear response, anyway - you're afraid to admit that your existence can be ruined in a single stroke because people like you have destroyed the social safety net in this country.

luvnomi
luvnomi

The common thread here is the slum lords. Good riddence. As for the immediate evacuation of apartment buildings by the police...sounds like the tornado was welcome by the city planners.

Donald Allen
Donald Allen

This article is on point! Please read the bogus report given to the Minneapolis Foundation by the Northside Community Response Team on what they say has happened here >Google Docs:https://docs.google.com/viewer....

Secondly, why are there more than 50+ homes still with tarps on them. See the Minneapolis Foundation's report on who got money and what they should of done: http://www.minneapolisfoundati...

Yes, there was a storm in north Minneapolis long before the tornado and one currently that shows benign neglect.

Ibfree2k
Ibfree2k

There are folks always living on the edge, and always falling over it: The notion that these folks are forgotten or left behind is the same old worn out refrain from some folks that we aren't doing enough, for them, we will never do enough, nor can we to make those folks happy, yes the word "Never" is accurate, and where are these folks? Helping all these poor unfortunates or just griping about them? What the writer does not recognize is all the houses/families that did get help, new roofs, fences, paint, siding, garages, how many families took advantage of the situation and added living space to their damaged homes! What the writer didn't say was, 1000's of volunteers combed the neighborhood on multiple occasions cleaning up debris and knocking on every door multiple times. We had city, community, county, Federal, state and numerous non-profits to help, because a few souls didn't get saved, or qualify, it is not a failure! They would have the taxpayers write checks for all no matter the situation. Perhaps from time to time it would be worthwhile to focus on the success, of those that did have insurance, they did think ahead, they were prepared, and that should be the model to others, living on the edge has its consequences, and sometimes they can be severe. Looking for a scape goat, try mother nature, or try foolish assumptions that folks make, "it will never happen to me" and when it does blame others for their misfortune, but never take their advice. I am in agreement with Jeff (Its a very disappointing article) Yes, I live in the T-Zone.

Jeff Skrenes
Jeff Skrenes

I'm disappointed with the reporting here. I'm not going to say the city has been perfect because obviously there are goals they haven't met. "The City" in general gets mentioned as a culprit, but there seems to be little here to indicate an attempt to reach anyone who specifically works on the tornado response effort.

Furthermore, at least one or two landlords are specifically described as being "delinquent" or inadequate in their response to the tornado. Yet those landlords aren't named either. The folks whose suffering is chronicled here have legitimate concerns with both their landlords and the city; I don't discount that at all. But this story feels like it was written with the goal of taking a swipe at established powers as a priority over telling the whole story.

Robyn
Robyn

What a powerful story. Why has there been so little media coverage on the continued efforts to recover from the tornado? For such a great state, it is a shame we are have our resources so disproportionately dispersed, in favor of those that already have privilege. We need some real change to happen.

mark lowry
mark lowry

Why don't the people who need help, help each other? Why the expectation for someone else to step in and fix their problems?

HurdyGurdy
HurdyGurdy

Well, it doesn't really matter what they should have done; that's besides the point. We can play that game all day long: They should have lived in a different area, they should have studied meteorology and learned to predict tornadoes better - give me a break already. These are people that need help now, not advice for when they start time traveling. Mistakes (if they were even made) should not be punished for a lifetime, and the children of North Minneapolis shouldn't be homeless and hungry because their parents are in a desperate situation. Blaming the victim is a great way to hide personal guilt and responsibility, but it doesn't do anything for our society.

mark lowry
mark lowry

People in a desperate situation shouldn't continue to have children. Neighbors should help neighbors. You can't knock on "societies'" door and offer to help them in trade for helping you. Darwin fixed this type of behavior before society.

Guest
Guest

So, we should just give these people things? If that was the case, why should anyone plan ahead and buy insurance? Lets reward stupidity?

guest
guest

I like how helping someone who went through a tragedy turns into "giving someone a handout." The greed and the excuses people make to not help someone out is disgusting. YUCK.

Guest
Guest

How would renters insurance matter? If you were simply renting, move on.Now if you owned the home and had homeowners insurance, that would certainly help. Not having homeowners insurance is a pretty stupid move.

Guest
Guest

How many of these renters had renters insurance? It's unfortunate what happened but when you prepare before the disaster it makes things much easier to handle afterwards.

Michele
Michele

Some of these North Side residents live from paycheck to paycheck. They cannot afford renters insurance. Part of being a good human being is helpin your fellow man, some where along the way we have forgotten that. If you pay taxes as I'm sure he does, he should be able to get help, or what do we as citizens pay taxes for???

retail employee
retail employee

Not many people think to get it. Perhaps raising awareness for renters would help in the future. Right now it's rather irrelevant because they need help now.

Guest
Guest

Renter's insurance is cheap and shouldn't be optional.

Optional is internet, cell phones & cable TV.

Research
Research

Agreed but renters insurance only covers the things you have. What good are those things without a place to put them?

Guest
Guest

Most of these stories are people renting and complaining that the landlord won't repair. If they had renters insurance, they can get coverage for temporary housing and then get out of the area.

The other home owners like the Porters should have had better Home owners coverage. They probably wnet for the cheapest coverage and now they complain that the government won't help them.

Spencer
Spencer

Many did not have insurance, some were underinsured, others had problems with insurance companies. My family did ok, but we were out a deductible and had to pay for repairs and additional living expenses up front. We didn't lose a vehicle, but many did. Who is going to keep full coverage on an old car?

I could go on and on. Its easy to look in from the outside and claim that people don't deserve any help, but shame on you if you do. This is hardly a situation to be judged from a quick look. Come to North Minneapolis and learn what is going on. Even people with good jobs, good insurance, and who were right on top of rebuilding are still struggling with insurance, inspectors, and contractors. Imagine how hard hit the less prepared people were.

 
Minnesota Concert Tickets
Loading...