612 Brew, Fulton Beer, Surly, and the craft beer renaissance

Raise a pint to local breweries

"People are into it if it's local," Alvey says. "The more small local breweries we have, the more people will be exposed to this type of beer who may not have been exposed to this type of beer before. That means more customers for all of us."

ON A HOT SUMMER EVENING, Schroth is laughing and drinking a beer in the small garage with the 612 Brew crew. The group includes her landlords Joe and Emily Yost, who, along with providing the space, are both partners in the company. The stranger from that night was Robert Kasak, brewer and owner of 612 Brew.

"I felt so sorry about scaring her," says Kasak. "But now she drinks the beer a lot."

The Fulton Beer team raise a glass: Joe Diely, Ryan Petz, Brian Hoffman and Peter Grande.
Tony Nelson
The Fulton Beer team raise a glass: Joe Diely, Ryan Petz, Brian Hoffman and Peter Grande.
The 612 Brew crew at their garage brewery: Robert Kasak, Joe Yost,
Emily Yost, Adit Kalra and Ryan Libby.
Tony Nelson
The 612 Brew crew at their garage brewery: Robert Kasak, Joe Yost, Emily Yost, Adit Kalra and Ryan Libby.

"And it's gotten a lot better," Schroth interjects. "That first beer I didn't like so much. But this is really good."

612 Brew's goal is reflected in its name: the company wants to bring beer back to a city that hasn't produced it commercially since the Grain Belt brewery closed in 1975. Locating its operations in Minneapolis is a key part of the 612 Brew brand identity. Once the company opens its brewery, the new ordinance will be a big help in meeting one of the company's major goals: building a fan base.

"People can come to the brewery and get to know who's making the product," says Libby. "It helps with getting your product out to the community."

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