WEDNESDAY 5.20

Animal Collective

First Avenue

The obsessive sonic experimentation of Animal Collective has evolved over successive albums to the point that their ninth, Merriweather Post Pavilion, is not only an accomplished pastiche of the group's incantatory, electronic rhythm and drone psychedelia, but also their most accessible. Pop and melodic conceits are everywhere, suggesting links to the likes of Brian Wilson's Beach Boys and Syd Barrett's Pink Floyd, even while AC's Avey Tare (David Portner), Panda Bear (Noah Lennox), and Geologist (Brain Weitz)—without Deakin (Josh Dibb) on this record—continue pushing sound frontiers. On "Daily Routine," for instance, keyboard skirmishes and throbbing rhythms pepper a languid pulse while vocals seem to pop out of random holes in the sound fabric. Simmering, spacey electronics and wistful vocals suddenly erupt into a thunderous rhythm assault on "In the Flowers." The sing-along chorus on "Summertime Clothes" is accompanied by corkscrewing electronic fireworks. And the soca-like rhythms and frenetic sound effects of "Brother Sport" suggest a carnival cavalcade that's just getting underway. Eschewing the oppressiveness of some electronica, AC are all about unveiling the giddy joys of the sound universe. With Grouper. All ages. $15/$17 at the door. 6 p.m. 701 First Ave. N., Minneapolis; 612.332.1775. —Rick Mason

THURSDAY 5.21

Wolf Eyes and Black Dice

Triple Rock Social Club

File tonight's noisenik bill under "life-affirming anti-entertainment"—or maybe just "autistic-aggro bliss"—as a pair of crud-tone titans who've collaborated before team up for a skull-crack of a joint tour. Black Dice are a trio from Brooklyn, New York, with designs on your equilibrium: They'd like to wine it, dose it, electroshock it, then whiplash it into an irreversible psychosis. Hailing from Michigan, Wolf Eyes are more interested in making you relive the most uncomfortable, pre-murderdeathkill scenes from every nightmare-causing horror flick you've ever watched by stringing together scraps of rusty post-industrial dread. The Dice just dropped Repo, their most accessible slab yet; Wolf Eyes are gearing up for the summer release of Pretending Alive, a follow-up to 2006's stellar Human Animal. (Wolf Eyes are so ungodly prolific that I've gotta stress that we're talking about studio albums here, as opposed to small-run/vinyl edits of live recordings.) What will this show sound like? The end of the world, more or less. Which is why you'll be there, with bells on. With Adidas. 18+. $15. 9 p.m. 629 Cedar Ave. S., Minneapolis; 612.333.7399. Ray Cummings

FRIDAY 5.22

Rock for Pussy

First Avenue

Now in its sixth year, the annual David Bowie tribute concert Rock for Pussy is boasting one of its biggest and most talented batch of guest singers yet. Organized by 89.3 the Current DJ and Bowie addict Mary Lucia and featuring a talented house backing band (including John Eller, Chris Perricelli of Little Man, Dave Russ, Noah Levy), the benefit this year stars singer-songwriter Jeremy Messersmith, writer Jim Walsh, Venus and All the Pretty Horses, Ciaran Daly of the Idle Hands, the Current's Local Show host David Campbell, former Jayhawk Marc Perlman, and Petal Pusher autobiographer Laurie Lindeen. Recent expat Lori Barbero will even return to town to sing a song or two at the event, which is a fundraiser for the Minnesota Valley Humane Society cat shelter. In the words of Mary Lucia, Rock for Pussy promotes "boys in makeup, David Bowie, and cats." What more could anyone ask for? 18+. $6/$8 at the door. 8 p.m. 701 First Ave. N., Minneapolis; 612.332.1775. Andrea Swensson

Black Moth Super Rainbow

Triple Rock Social Club

Listening to Black Moth Super Rainbow is like plummeting into a Salvador Dali painting. You may not know why that clock is melting, but you accept it, and soon enough you are riding around on flying tigers and having a gay old time. Black Moth Super Rainbow fertilize their alien terrain with swirling layers of synth and the most up-to-date electronic sound makers, creating an elegant if artificial landscape. Yet the group manage to drench their glitches in a friendly jacket of warmth well-known to our sunny planet. The gooey lyrics of the strangely monikered singer, Tobacco, sound like any snippet from a hippie campfire jam, only he masks them in the isolating oscillations of robotic vocoders. The result is an emotionally upbeat, chilled-out love fest, best to soothe the nerves before interstellar takeoff. With School of Seven Bells. 18+. $11/$13 at the door. 9 p.m. 629 Cedar Ave. S., Minneapolis; 612.333. 7399. Erin Roof

SATURDAY 5.23

Magic Castles

Hexagon Bar

The name Magic Castles conjures up mythological tales of wizardry and adventure. As such, when imagining what a band by that name might sound like, it wouldn't be out of line to predict a booming prog-rock amalgamation of extended keyboard solos intricately woven between booming guitars and lyrical blasts delicately recalling the stories of knights and their heroic battles against nature's most furious creatures. Nothing could be further from the truth, however, as the Minneapolis-based group project gently distorted vocal harmonies over a soothing psychedelic cloud. Magic Castles' new album, Dreams of Dreams of Dreams, was recorded on two-inch tape rather than a digital master, the recording process further adding to the layered density of the band's sound. Joining them at this CD-release show will be Vampire Hands, Daughters of the Sun, and Denver, Colorado's Woodsmen. 21+. Free. 9 p.m. 2600 27th Ave. S., Minneapolis; 612.722.3454. Chris DeLine

Pennywise

Myth

From the time of their formation in 1988, SoCal's Pennywise have been one of punk's most consistent bands. Last year the group threw fans for a loop, however, releasing their latest album, Reason to Believe, via their MySpace page. Though a corporate release was out of line with the band's historical ideology (they backed away from signing with a corporate label during punk's revival in the mid-1990s and have been outspoken in their philosophy against big business), and despite having released nine albums with Epitaph Records (since first signing with the independent label in 1990), they did so for a reason: to give back to their fans. And that they did, as Reason to Believe was downloaded over 500,000 times. In continued support of the album, the band is co-headlining the Jagermeister Music Tour with dub rock trio Pepper. With Outlaw Nation and Emcee Big B. All ages. $25. 5 p.m. 3090 Southlawn Dr., Maplewood; 651.779.6984. —Chris DeLine

SUNDAY 5.24

Soundset '09

Canterbury Park

Why does this year's edition of the Rhymesayers-promoted all-day hip-hop festival Soundset stand a good chance of being the best one yet? Well, for one thing, it's at Canterbury Park instead of the inhospitable concrete hot plate that is the HHH Metrodump's parking lot. For another, it features one of the best independent/classic-skewing hip-hop lineups in recent memory. The Twin Cities scene is in full force here, with Atmosphere, Brother Ali, Heiruspecs, Eyedea & Abilities, P.O.S., and a number of others. And they'll be joined by luminaries from across the continent: El-P, who just reissued Company Flow's earth-shaking '97 debut Funcrusher Plus and maintains the momentum of '07s devastating I'll Sleep When You're Dead; DOOM (minus the MF, plus the rightly hyped Born Like This), who'll hopefully break from the whole send-an-impostor routine to drop knowledge in person; the full original lineup of West Coast icons the Pharcyde; raspy Canadian junkshop genius Buck 65; Philly's 21st-century street-rap icon Freeway (paired with Seattle secret-weapon producer Jake One); and Prince Paul, the man who produced the first two De La albums and created some of hip hop's most enduring concept records. There'll also be exhibitions of other aspects of hip-hop culture, traditional (b-boy/b-girl competitions) and otherwise (skateboarding sessions and a custom car show). All ages. $27. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 1100 Canterbury Rd, Shakopee; 612.377.0044. Nate Patrin

TUESDAY 5.26

Rickie Lee Jones

Dakota Jazz Club

She's known as the Duchess of Coolsville, but like Joni Mitchell, to whom she's often compared, Rickie Lee Jones is far more complex and mercurial than the affectations of hipsterism ascribed to her would suggest. Yeah, she hung out with Tom Waits, de facto chief of the bohos, during her early days in L.A.—even wore a beret fer chrissake—and her sly, slurred delivery of lyrics about colorful characters amid noirish, jazzy arrangements seemed to seal the deal. But every album she's issued—sometimes at significant intervals—over the last 30 years has in some sense defied expectations, as she's veered from pop to jazz to romantic duets to standards, each time putting her own signature twist on things. Her last two studio albums were no exception: 2003's The Evening of My Best Day was essentially a skewering of the Dubya crowd's atrocities, while on 2007's The Sermon on Exposition Boulevard she sang her interpretation of the actual words of Jesus (devoid of the religious hustle), often in a wiry rock context. She'll appear here in a rare club performance, kicking off the Dakota's summer-long American Songwriters' Series. $45-$60. 7 p.m. 1010 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis; 612.332.1010. —Rick Mason

Southern Culture on the Skids

First Avenue

Partying just doesn't get much more raucous or demented than when it's fueled by Southern Culture on the Skids' blistering, take-no-prisoners assault. Raging psychobilly, mountain surf, and mutant gems culled from country, R&B, and even Brit-rock come blasting fast and furious from the veteran North Carolina trio of Rick Miller, Mary Huff, and Dave Hartman, each milking the inbred, trailer-park, paper-bag-decanter shtick for all it's worth. Huff's bouffant alone entitles her to honorary membership in the B-52s. Besides being vehicles for his searing guitar work, Miller's originals wallow in the glories of the white-trash lifestyle, from doublewides to cheap motels, dirt tracks, and, of course, getting liquored up and lacquered down. It's been a couple of years since SCOTS's last one, Countrypolitan Favorites, a collection of perversely inspired covers ranging from Lynn Anderson and Don Gibson to the Kinks and T. Rex. Don't forget the white lightnin' and something to hack through the kudzu. With Los Straitjackets. 18+. $13/$15 at the door. 8 p.m. 701 First Ave. N., Minneapolis; 612.332.1775. —Rick Mason

Show Pages
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
 

Around The Web

Concert Calendar

  • April
  • Wed
    16
  • Thu
    17
  • Fri
    18
  • Sat
    19
  • Sun
    20
  • Mon
    21
  • Tue
    22
Minnesota Event Tickets
Loading...