The Hit Parade Revisited

In an age of shrinking budgets, the city of Minneapolis is spending more money than ever to settle lawsuits against the MPD

By G.R. Anderson Jr. and Paul Demko

Sometime after midnight on July 29, 2003, Charles and Angela Rostance were rousted from bed by flashing lights and the blare of police sirens outside. The recently married graduate students, in town from Arizona to visit Charles's father, went to their bedroom window looking out on 35th Street in south Minneapolis to see what the commotion was about. As Charles Rostance later described the incident in a sworn deposition, he saw a man seated on a motorcycle with a cop car pulled up close behind. The police officers had gotten out of the car. Their guns were drawn and pointed at him.

They ordered the man to get off the bike and put his hands on top of his head. According to Rostance's statement, the man immediately complied. At about this time, Angela joined her husband at the window, watching as the cops directed the motorcyclist to get on his knees in the street. He promptly followed this order as well.

At this point, according to separate statements given by both Charles and Angela, an officer ran up to the man being arrested and kicked him between the shoulder blades. "His face bounced off the pavement," Charles recalled in May. "Nothing broke the fall except for his face."

According to Angela's deposition, two more squad cars arrived at this point. A group of officers surrounded the downed motorcyclist and kicked him at least three times in his side. She added: "I couldn't really see the guy very well but I saw several cops around him kicking and I saw bright lights and I said, 'Oh my God, they're tasing him.'"

Seeing this, Angela Rostance phoned 911. "I said something along the lines of, 'There are a bunch of cops that are beating this guy up,'" she noted in her deposition. "They seemed extremely annoyed and said, 'If there are cops there, I'm sure the situation is under control.'"

When Angela returned to the window, the motorcyclist was handcuffed and led to a squad car by an officer. But before the man was placed in the back seat, according to Angela, the cop got in one more lick, ramming the motorcyclist's head into the door frame.

The man being arrested, Sherif Mahmoud Mansour, was subsequently charged with driving under the influence and fleeing a police officer. Mansour, a native Egyptian, pleaded guilty to drunk driving, but the latter charge was ultimately dismissed by a judge. "He's a nice guy," says his attorney, David Shulman. "He just looks like a terrorist by our standards."

Roughly a year after the arrest, Mansour filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court. The civil complaint charges that the cops repeatedly punched, kicked, and used a stun gun on him for no reason. Minneapolis Police Department officers G.T. Moore, Matthew St. George, and Brian Thureson are named as defendants in the case.

Mansour's case against the city of Minneapolis and the officers is still pending in federal court. According to Shulman, the two parties are currently in settlement talks.

At this point, according to separate statements given by both Charles and Angela, an officer ran up to the man being arrested and kicked him between the shoulder blades. "His face bounced off the pavement," Charles recalled in May. "Nothing broke the fall except for his face."

According to Angela's deposition, two more squad cars arrived at this point. A group of officers surrounded the downed motorcyclist and kicked him at least three times in his side. She added: "I couldn't really see the guy very well but I saw several cops around him kicking and I saw bright lights and I said, 'Oh my God, they're tasing him.'"

Seeing this, Angela Rostance phoned 911. "I said something along the lines of, 'There are a bunch of cops that are beating this guy up,'" she noted in her deposition. "They seemed extremely annoyed and said, 'If there are cops there, I'm sure the situation is under control.'"

When Angela returned to the window, the motorcyclist was handcuffed and led to a squad car by an officer. But before the man was placed in the back seat, according to Angela, the cop got in one more lick, ramming the motorcyclist's head into the door frame.

The man being arrested, Sherif Mahmoud Mansour, was subsequently charged with driving under the influence and fleeing a police officer. Mansour, a native Egyptian, pleaded guilty to drunk driving, but the latter charge was ultimately dismissed by a judge. "He's a nice guy," says his attorney, David Shulman. "He just looks like a terrorist by our standards."

Roughly a year after the arrest, Mansour filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court. The civil complaint charges that the cops repeatedly punched, kicked, and used a stun gun on him for no reason. Minneapolis Police Department officers G.T. Moore, Matthew St. George, and Brian Thureson are named as defendants in the case.

Mansour's case against the city of Minneapolis and the officers is still pending in federal court. According to Shulman, the two parties are currently in settlement talks.

1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Minnesota Concert Tickets
Loading...