Hot Llamas Thirsting for Glacial Omens

Peter Richards, Noelle Kocot, and Ben Doyle write a new verse in the poetry of the American avant-garde

(Top) Pigeon English: Noelle Kocot and her friend take poetic flights of fancy. (Bottom) Poor Richards's almanac: Oubliette author Peter Richards.
(Top) Pigeon English: Noelle Kocot and her friend take poetic flights of fancy. (Bottom) Poor Richards's almanac: Oubliette author Peter Richards.

"Hush I think now I may/be the future...," utters another of Doyle's poems, and if you'd like a glimpse of what's to come in poetry, each of these new volumes will take you there. Emerging now after the Language wave is a sizable phalanx of new American poets with adventurous and generous visions. They're published almost entirely by independent and university presses, and by plucky little magazines like Fence, Spinning Jenny, and Volt. They have no premeditated collective agenda, and many are their modes. But they do have a way of working in what Salamun calls that "inscrutable" place where poems can be inviting yet thoroughly surprising.

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